anonymous
  • anonymous
For what kind of motion are the instantaneous and average velocities equal? Why is the answer constant-velocity motion?
Physics
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this
and thousands of other questions

anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815 @UnkleRhaukus can you please help me?
anonymous
  • anonymous
anonymous
  • anonymous
because there is no acceleration when an object is moving with constant velocity so the instantaneous velocity is constant. If velocity isn't changing, the average over any interval is equal to the velocity at any specific time.

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
then is it possible for an object's acceleration to be zero if the velocity if zero
anonymous
  • anonymous
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
You can't confidently say that if acceleration is zero then velocity will surely be zero or if velocity is zero then acceleration will surely be zero. Like suppose a car is moving with a constant velocity then it's in uniform motion i.e. it has a velocity but no acceleration also think what happens when we throw a ball vertically above the ground, at a instant after attaining certain height its velocity becomes zero but it is still experiencing an acceleration (acceleration due to gravity) towards the ground so a body can have a zero velocity but still be accelerated.
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok. how can you determine the speed of an object with the acceleration
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
\(\color{blue}{\text{Originally Posted by}}\) @prguan For what kind of motion are the instantaneous and average velocities equal? Why is the answer constant-velocity motion? \(\color{blue}{\text{End of Quote}}\) Suppose a car is moving with an accelerated motion such that its acceleration is \(\sf 1 m/s^2\). Now let's note its velocity at different instants. Time Velocity 0 0 1 1 2 2 3 3 We see that its instant velocity at different instants of time will be different like, 1, 2 and \(\sf 3 m/s\) but its average velocity will be 3m/s \(\sf (\frac{1+2+3}{3})\)
anonymous
  • anonymous
why is the average velocity 3m/s (1+2+3)=6 6/3 is 2
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
No I am sorry, average velocity will be equal to \(\sf \frac{Total~Distance}{Total~Time}\) And in the above case total distance = \(\sf (1 \times 1) +(1\times 2)+(1\times 3)\) Total time = 3 seconds, so average velocity = 2m/s
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
Now, let's consider the case of a car going through a constant velocity of say 3 m/s i.e. it has no acceleration. Right? Let's do the same experiment and note its velocities at various instants of time. Time Velocity 0 0 1 3 2 3 3 3 So we see that velocity this car is same at all the instant of times and not only that its average velocity is also same as its instantaneous velocity. Check this by finding out its average velocity as i did in the above table.
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok i though to find acceleration it was distance/ time
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
No, Distance/Time = Velocity and this formula is only applicable when the object is moving with constant velocity i.e. it has zero acceleration. To find acceleration you can use formula, V=U+at, where, V= final velocity U= initial velocity a= acceleration t=time
anonymous
  • anonymous
so final velocity= initial velocity + acceleration x time x where is where- displacement
anonymous
  • anonymous
what does where represent?
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
No where is nothing c:
anonymous
  • anonymous
im confused
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
No, Distance/Time = Velocity and this formula is only applicable when the object is moving with constant velocity i.e. it has zero acceleration. To find acceleration you can use formula, \(\boxed{V=U+at}\) Where, the symbols has following meaning V= final velocity U= initial velocity a= acceleration t=time
Abhisar
  • Abhisar
Is it clear now?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i guess

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.