Help with calculus!

At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get our expert's

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this and thousands of other questions.

A community for students.

Help with calculus!

Mathematics
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

Get this expert

answer on brainly

SEE EXPERT ANSWER

Get your free account and access expert answers to this and thousands of other questions

\[\frac{ \lim }{ x \rightarrow-7^{+} }f(x)=-\infty \]Graph this.
how far did you get?
I'm going to start a blank xy graph. Add to the graph what you have so far |dw:1441237470407:dw|

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question

Other answers:

click the pencil on my drawing to be able to draw on it
I couldn't figure out where to start.
How can you draw infinity?
ok let's start by plotting a point at -7 on the x axis |dw:1441237530533:dw|
then draw a vertical dashed line through -7 |dw:1441237577069:dw|
the limit says "as x gets closer and closer and closer to -7 from the right side, the value of y heads off to negative infinity" so there are a number of ways to do this. You could have something like this |dw:1441237684271:dw|
or something like this |dw:1441237697243:dw|
or maybe something like this |dw:1441237713578:dw| the majority of this graph doesn't matter as long as you approach -infinity as you get closer to -7 from the right side
Oh..that makes much more sense. Can you check my answers for some others? I think I might have them wrong.
sure
Thanks so much!\[\frac{ \lim }{ x \rightarrow5^{+} }f(x)=-8\]
|dw:1441237595205:dw|
That's what I put but I don't think it's right...
I'm going to delete the horizontal line |dw:1441237965993:dw|
the idea here is that as we get closer to x = 5 from the right side, the y value gets closer to -8 so here is one way to do it |dw:1441238039952:dw|
here is an alternative way |dw:1441238056519:dw|
So there is no line coming from the right?
just like before, the majority of it doesn't matter as long as you end up at y = -8 when you approach from the right side of x = 5
`So there is no line coming from the right?` what do you mean?
*left
I meant left sorry.
oh, that could be possible, yes you could have |dw:1441238163678:dw| or |dw:1441238177135:dw| and I'm just realizing that your example is perfectly valid. You can approach x = 5 from the right and end up getting closer and closer to y = -8
So why do they need a plus next to the 5 under the limit?
that notation means "right hand limit" since we're approaching from the right side of that x value
So how does that apply to the graph?
for right hand limits, you don't need to worry about the left side so that's why we could stop at x = 5 and not continue on
it allows us to graph more variety we could have graphs that stop at x = 5 or we could have graphs that continue on
Okay I'm going to go with your answer just in case.
\[\frac{ \lim }{ x \rightarrow \infty }f(x)=4\]
a little \(\LaTeX\) help for you \[\lim_{ x \to\infty }f(x)=4\] \lim_{ x \to\infty }f(x)=4
|dw:1441238256310:dw|
What is Latex?
it's a tool to help write math notation
Oh...
that graph you drew is correct here is another possible answer for the limit \[\Large \lim_{x\to\infty}f(x) = 4\] |dw:1441238706491:dw|
and another possible answer |dw:1441238735088:dw| the idea is to get closer to that horizontal line as x gets larger
of course, we could cross that horizontal line like this |dw:1441238767240:dw| but notice how we still approach that horizontal line as x gets bigger
Okay so if the number under the limit is + or - that number, would I just extend the line like what I did on the second problem?
I'm not sure what you mean
you mean like that \(\Large 5^{+}\) notation?
Ya the notation on the top. If it is + and - (left and right) would you extend the line across the graph like what I did in the 2nd problem I gave?
It's possible to extend it through, but also just as valid to stop at that x value. Both interpretations are valid for that one-sided limit If you were talking about a 2-sided limit, then you would have to extend it through because you would be approaching that x value from both sides (left and right)
|dw:1441239084919:dw|
|dw:1441239111134:dw|
|dw:1441239138986:dw|
Okay I understood that. Last one:\[\left(\begin{matrix}\lim \\ x \rightarrow-\infty\end{matrix}\right)f(x)=-2\]
|dw:1441238954330:dw|
Sorry the drawing board was malfunctioning
It's suppose to be a straight line
one last thing though, it's possible to evaluate a one-sided limit on a connected curve. Just approach from one side |dw:1441239320678:dw|
Ohh ya! I forgot about that.
as for your other problem, as long as you're approaching y = -2 as x heads off to negative infinity, then you have the proper graph another valid answer is this |dw:1441239584767:dw|
something like this is also possible |dw:1441239609022:dw|
Okay thanks! That's all I needed. :)
you're welcome

Not the answer you are looking for?

Search for more explanations.

Ask your own question