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anonymous

  • one year ago

The arc length of the circle is 100 degrees and is 7 meters. Find the perimeter of the sector.

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  1. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    hmmm the arc length is 100 degrees? as opposed to 100 meters?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have no clue. i guess its safe to assume that cause all it says is the arc length is a 100 degrees. The length of that stretched out is 7 meters. So i have to find the perimeter of the sector which i dont even know what that is.

  3. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441238511043:dw|

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441237812416:dw|

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I thought that was the arc length

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    cause thats the central angle

  7. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    right, but the arc's lenght is not given in degrees, it'd be a flat measuring unit, like meter, or feet now, the central angle of the arc, would be 100 degrees

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    o

  9. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    so..hmm it sounds a lot like |dw:1441238753083:dw| if that's the case, all you'd need to get is the arc's length and sum it to the radii given

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah... i dont really know how to do that

  11. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    \(\bf \textit{arc's length}=s=\cfrac{\theta\cdot \pi\cdot r }{180}\impliedby \theta\textit{ in degrees}\)

  12. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    so the perimeter is 7 + arc's length + 7

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Am i suppose to get a decimal??

  14. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    yes

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can i put 16pi/3 for exact???? as the arc length??

  16. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    well.. you could also keep as rational as well got any choices on what's expected? float or rational?

  17. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    sure

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so 30.7552????

  19. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    well... I get another figure https://www.google.com/search?client=opera&q=7%2B(100*pi*7/180)%2B7&sourceid=opera&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8&channel=suggest&gws_rd=ssl

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    hmmm

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what would be the exact form

  22. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    ohh .. one sec

  23. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    \(\bf \cfrac{\theta\pi r}{180}\implies \cfrac{100\cdot \pi \cdot 7}{180}\implies \cfrac{35\pi }{9} \\ \quad \\ 7+\cfrac{35\pi }{9}+7\implies 14+\cfrac{35\pi }{9}\)

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That would be the perimeter?

  25. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    yes

  26. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    we could use 3.1416 for \(\pi\) , then again, that'd make it a float, or decimal :)

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yeah. Can u help me on one last question please??

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Solve using S=r(theta) Radius Central Angle Arc length ? pi/3 3/2 m

  29. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    very straighforward you said it ->S =r(theta)

  30. jdoe0001
    • one year ago
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    \(\frac{\pi }{3}\) is already in radian units so S = r * \(\theta\)

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    3/2 = r(pi/3)

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jdoe0001

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @jim_thompson5910

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    everytime i solve it i get a weird decimal and its confusing me

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