anonymous
  • anonymous
Fan and Medal
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
2 Attachments
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910, @dan815
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jdoe0001 ,@emily_wilson

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
@emily_wilson
anonymous
  • anonymous
r u there
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah
anonymous
  • anonymous
can u help me with my homework its algebra 1
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay I can try, am I supposed to do all of that?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ill do it with u though
anonymous
  • anonymous
@beckyg111
anonymous
  • anonymous
what is the paper/book called?
anonymous
  • anonymous
springboard
anonymous
  • anonymous
the green/rainbow one?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ya why
anonymous
  • anonymous
I cant read all of the picture
anonymous
  • anonymous
which one
anonymous
  • anonymous
13
anonymous
  • anonymous
@haleyright
anonymous
  • anonymous
13 right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah mostly just the word problems
anonymous
  • anonymous
the 2 cutoff words are equation and equal
anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910
haleyright
  • haleyright
this is hard
anonymous
  • anonymous
i know
haleyright
  • haleyright
srry
anonymous
  • anonymous
@_alex_urena_
haleyright
  • haleyright
i tried to understand but its complicated
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
anybody there who can help me
anonymous
  • anonymous
pls @dan815
anonymous
  • anonymous
@kiamousekia
anonymous
  • anonymous
yay @jim_thompson5910 ur here
anonymous
  • anonymous
and @dan815
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
which one are you stuck on?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i need help on 13-15, 17, 21, 25, 26, 27:b, 28, 34, 35, 36, 37, 38, 39:a,b, 40. i know its a lot pls forgive me
anonymous
  • anonymous
nvr mind i dont need help on 28
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910 , @dan815 r u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
well there are a lot of similar problems, so why not do it where we help with a few and you practice on the rest?
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
lets start with 13-15
dan815
  • dan815
okay so lets saw for a member for 1 year he just pays 35 a NON-member will pay lets say 5 dollars every time he uses the gym let n the number of uses lets see at what number of uses the member = non member 35=5*n when n=7, 5*7=35 so a non member if he uses the gym 7 times he will pay the same as a guy who payed for a whole year, if he uses the gym more than 7 times he will have to pay more than the guy with a membership, if he uses the gym less than 7 times he will have to pay less Now for your question instead of 5 dollars every time he uses, they have a different number or some random number k
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
I'm stumped. It seems like there's information missing in #13. How much does it cost per visit? It doesn't say.
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
is the problem cut off or something?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
@dan815 where did you get those values from?
anonymous
  • anonymous
it says that the cost of being a member of the frequent visitor program = the cost of not being a member
dan815
  • dan815
just made it up for an example, instead of 5 i think ninja has to use a variable there
anonymous
  • anonymous
the variable is n
anonymous
  • anonymous
which is the number of visits per year
anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815
anonymous
  • anonymous
he left
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
well I still think there's missing info, but anyway, let's say the cost per day is k dollars. The k is some unknown number if you visit n times for that year, then it costs k*n dollars
anonymous
  • anonymous
@_
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
set that equal to the 5 dollar yearly fee to get k*n = 5
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
make sense?
anonymous
  • anonymous
so thats the equation for 13, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
do you see how I formed it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
what about 14 and 15
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
I think they want you to solve for n
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
in #14
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh let me try
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it 5?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
get n all by itself in the equation `k*n = 5`
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh let me try it that way
anonymous
  • anonymous
how do u divide 5 by k
anonymous
  • anonymous
nvr mind how do u get n by itself
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
you just leave it like that, so you'd have \[\Large n = \frac{5}{k}\]
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
that's what you'd have after dividing both sides by k
anonymous
  • anonymous
and then
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
if you knew the value of k (the number it represents), then you could replace k with that number and divide
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
but we don't know what k is so we leave it like 5/k
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok so thats #14
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yeah
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
#15
anonymous
  • anonymous
how do u do number 15
anonymous
  • anonymous
nvrmind i know that
anonymous
  • anonymous
#17??
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what would be the answer to #15
anonymous
  • anonymous
actually i dunno could u help me
anonymous
  • anonymous
u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
give it a try and tell me what you think
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it 5 divided by the money.......i dunno!
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what does n represent
anonymous
  • anonymous
the # of visits??
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yes, so 5/k represents the number of visits (because it's equal to n)
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
if k = 1, then 5/k = 5/1 = 5 basically saying if the price per visit is $1, then you'd have to make 5 visits for the two costs to be equal
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok thank u very much
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
no problem
anonymous
  • anonymous
what about #17
anonymous
  • anonymous
8x + 5 = 3x + 15 solve for x
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
bye
anonymous
  • anonymous
wait wat
anonymous
  • anonymous
.
anonymous
  • anonymous
no wait
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910
anonymous
  • anonymous
r u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
can you get all the x terms to one side? and everything else to the other side?
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me try
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it 8x+3x = 5+15
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
no
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
to move that 3x over, you have to subtract 3x from both sides
anonymous
  • anonymous
:O
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
you need the 3x on the right side to turn into 0x or 0 3x-3x = 0x = 0
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
|dw:1441242757695:dw|
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
|dw:1441242784001:dw|
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
|dw:1441242807116:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok then it will be 5x+5=15
anonymous
  • anonymous
@pooja195
anonymous
  • anonymous
r u there @jim_thompson5910
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
|dw:1441242986486:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
i was right
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
Now subtract 5 from both sides |dw:1441243014153:dw|
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
|dw:1441243025086:dw|
anonymous
  • anonymous
it will be 5x=10, right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
my final answer will be x=2
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
yay!!
anonymous
  • anonymous
now can u help me with #26?
anonymous
  • anonymous
what time is it for u?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what do you have so far for #26 ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
nothing cause i dont get it
anonymous
  • anonymous
u there?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i need help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
@me10000 my buddy
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
have you heard of the distributive property?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
I am not sure if I know this sorry....
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh now i get it the 2nd step is distributive property, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yeah because `2(x-1)` turns into `2*x+2*(-1)` which becomes `2x-2`
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
same with the `-3(x+2)`
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok what about the other steps
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
how are they simplifying line 2 to get line 3?
anonymous
  • anonymous
2x-3x - 2- -6 =-1x - 8
anonymous
  • anonymous
the other side stays the same
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
how is that left side simplified? what happened?
anonymous
  • anonymous
You got this slice...
anonymous
  • anonymous
i combined like terms
anonymous
  • anonymous
thanks for the encouragement @me10000 i would have been a goner if it wasnt for @jim_thompson5910
anonymous
  • anonymous
@jim_thompson5910 r u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
`i combined like terms` good so the reasoning is simply "combine like terms"
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
there's no fancy math term needed
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yep pm me if I can be of any assistance... With anything there than this...
anonymous
  • anonymous
lol ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
next step looks more complicated
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what's the change from line 3 to line 4?
anonymous
  • anonymous
let me see
anonymous
  • anonymous
they are trying to get the variable alone
anonymous
  • anonymous
or are they??
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yeah that's the ultimate goal
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
focus just on line 3 and line 4 what changes?
anonymous
  • anonymous
they are adding 4x to both sides
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yep
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
they are using the additive property of equality
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
additive property of equality if a=b, then a+c = b+c
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh now i get it
anonymous
  • anonymous
line 5 looks like the answer of line 4
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what changed here
anonymous
  • anonymous
i dunno
anonymous
  • anonymous
r u there
anonymous
  • anonymous
did u leave?? oh no!
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what changed from -1x+4x-8 = 8-4x+4x to 3x-8 = 8 look closely
anonymous
  • anonymous
nvrmind ur here i got scared
anonymous
  • anonymous
-1x+4x became 3x
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
so you combined like terms
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
same for -4x+4x = 0x = 0
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
Let me guess: the next line is additive property of equality, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
why would it be that rule?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Because they are adding 8 to both sides. Am I right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
good
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yay!!
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
I'll be right back.
anonymous
  • anonymous
the next line is combine like terms
anonymous
  • anonymous
ok
anonymous
  • anonymous
tell me when ur back
anonymous
  • anonymous
r u there yet
anonymous
  • anonymous
hello??
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
`the next line is combine like terms` correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
the next line is division property of equality, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
the last step is combine like terms, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
no, it's to convert the improper fraction to a mixed number
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok thanks
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
np
anonymous
  • anonymous
whats #27
anonymous
  • anonymous
u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what did you write in pencil? I can see something faintly written
anonymous
  • anonymous
thats for part a of the question. its this: 4w+12(w-1)=36
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
what does w represent
anonymous
  • anonymous
im sorry but i forgot it was for
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
how did you form the equation?
anonymous
  • anonymous
i copied from my teacher
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
and you don't remember how the teacher got it?
anonymous
  • anonymous
the teacher was ina hurry
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
give a guess what w represents
anonymous
  • anonymous
the total distance?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
w = walking w is the time spent walking
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
in hours
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
so w-1 is the time spent biking (1 hour less)
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
if you walk for w hours, and you walk at a speed of 4 mph, then how far do you walk?
anonymous
  • anonymous
4*w
anonymous
  • anonymous
u there
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yep, how far do you go when you bike?
anonymous
  • anonymous
12*w
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
not just w though
anonymous
  • anonymous
then what?
anonymous
  • anonymous
is it 12*w-1
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
the 12(w-1) like you wrote
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
12 times (w-1)
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes i was right the second time
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
so the two distances add to get `4w+12(w-1)`
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
that's how he got that left side
anonymous
  • anonymous
now we find the value of w, right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
yeah for part b
anonymous
  • anonymous
im doing it
anonymous
  • anonymous
i found it: x=3
anonymous
  • anonymous
am i right?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
w = 3 is correct
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
so he walked for 3 hrs and biked for 2 hrs (since w-1 = 3-1 = 2)
anonymous
  • anonymous
how did he walk 3 hrs though?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
you just solved to get w = 3
anonymous
  • anonymous
ya so?
jim_thompson5910
  • jim_thompson5910
w represented the number of hours walked
anonymous
  • anonymous
oh ok thanks now i get it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
thnks for everything bro ur the best.

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