HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
English 2 help! will fan and medal
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
Read these sentences and answer the question that follow. The girl spent the day at the beach. The girl forgot to bring sunscreen. The girl was badly sunburned. The girl could not go to the beach the next day. Which of these best combines the ideas in the group of sentences above to make an interesting sentence? A.Even though she did not put on sunscreen, the girl spent the whole day at the beach and could not go back the next day. B. The girl could not spend the whole day at the beach because, without sunscreen, she was badly sunburned the next day. C.The girl was badly sunburned after spending the day at the beach without sunscreen, so she could not go back to the beach the next day. D.The next day at the beach, the girl was badly sunburned because she forgot to put on sunscreen.  Question 4 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) "A Valentine" by Edgar Allan Poe 1.For her this rhyme is penned whose luminous eyes, 2.Brightly expressive as the twins of Leda, 3.Shall find her own sweet name, that nestling lies 4.Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader. 5.Search narrowly the lines!—they hold a treasure 6.Divine—a talisman—an amulet 7.That must be worn at heart. Search well the measure— 8.The words—the syllables! Do not forget 9.The trivialest point, or you may lose your labor 10.And yet there is in this no Gordian knot 11.Which one might not undo without a sabre, 12.If one could merely comprehend the plot. 13.Enwritten upon the leaf where now are peering 14.Eyes scintillating soul, there lie perdus 15.Three eloquent words oft uttered in the hearing 16.Of poets, by poets—as the name is a poet's, too, 17.Its letters, although naturally lying 18.Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando— 19.Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying! 20.You will not read the riddle, though you do the best you can do. Which of these devices does Poe use in lines 17–19? Simile Metaphor Hyperbole Alliteration
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
@kosonge @FrostFlare23
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I think the first one is A

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kosonge
  • kosonge
Look at it this way which one has all 4 sentences in one its not A
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
its c then
kosonge
  • kosonge
use the process of elimanation
kosonge
  • kosonge
so C is correct okay so number two
kosonge
  • kosonge
17.Its letters, although naturally lying 18.Like the knight Pinto—Mendez Ferdinando— 19.Still form a synonym for Truth—Cease trying!
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
he uses end rhyme but that is not a option
kosonge
  • kosonge
alliteration isnt correct
kosonge
  • kosonge
so cross d out
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
yup that is not rigth
kosonge
  • kosonge
neither is hyperbole
kosonge
  • kosonge
so simile or metaphor
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
will it be Metaphor
kosonge
  • kosonge
i believe its a simile i could be wrong
kosonge
  • kosonge
pick with what you know you have a 50 50 chance
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
yes it is I found it
kosonge
  • kosonge
great
kosonge
  • kosonge
hope I helped
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
This is about the same poem Which of these defines the word enwrapped in line 4? To be expected To be revealed To be explained To be hidden
kosonge
  • kosonge
4.Upon the page, enwrapped from every reader.
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I don't understand this
kosonge
  • kosonge
well if you look at the definition
kosonge
  • kosonge
to wrap or envelop in something. 2. to surround or envelop, as in slumber, longing, etc. 3. to absorb or engross, as in thought.
kosonge
  • kosonge
so if somethings is wrapped is it any of the first three
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
I found this as definition past tense: enwrapped; past participle: enwrapped
kosonge
  • kosonge
what do you think it is
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
It would be Option B. to be revealed
kosonge
  • kosonge
yes
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
Thanks again. I few more questions if you don't mind
kosonge
  • kosonge
sure go ahead
kosonge
  • kosonge
english is my thing
kosonge
  • kosonge
brb
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
from "EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE" by P.G. Wodehouse 1.She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' 2.I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. 3.She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. 4.I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 5.'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 6.'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' 7.I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 8.'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' 9.If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 10.'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' 11.And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 12.'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 13.'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 14.'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' 15.I scented danger. Read the excerpt from the passage and answer the question that follows. 13.'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 14.'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' What does Bertie mean when he uses "totter" and "trickle"? Bertie means to show that he's bored with life. Bertie means to show that he's irritated by Agatha. Bertie means to show that he's a man of leisure. Bertie means to show that he's a serious person.  Question 8 (Multiple Choice Worth 5 points) (LC) What type of plot structure allows authors to follow different characters through their own separate narratives, eventually converging, as the story is resolved? Episodic plot structure Parallel plot structure In medias res Flash-forward
kosonge
  • kosonge
give me About 5 minutes to read this]
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
sure thing!
kosonge
  • kosonge
the 1st one is b or C what do you think it is
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
b
kosonge
  • kosonge
yes
kosonge
  • kosonge
and a way yoou can see that is read the whole thing
kosonge
  • kosonge
and he knew he could try to bore her out
kosonge
  • kosonge
i Have no idea on 8 thats up to you
HelloKitty17
  • HelloKitty17
ok thanks for the help! I will tag you if I have any others!
kosonge
  • kosonge
ok

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