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Meehan98

  • one year ago

I need help with writing molecular equations. The original question states, "Write the balanced net ionic equation that occurs when copper (II) chloride and potassium phosphate react in water." The first step is to write the balanced molecular equation, and that is what I struggle with. I will type the equation that I have so far in the comments.

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  1. Meehan98
    • one year ago
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    \[Cu ^{2+}Cl _{2}^{-} + K _{3}^{+} PO _{4}^{2-}\rightarrow Cu(PO _{4}) + K _{3} Cl _{2}\]

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Close, but phosphate is \[PO _{4}^{3-}\] making your potassium incorrect also.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A molecular equation shows no ion (charges).

  4. Meehan98
    • one year ago
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    The final solution to the molecular equation is: \[3CuCl _{2} + 2 K _{3} PO _{4}\rightarrow 6 KCl + Cu _{3} (PO _{4})_{2}\] I don't understand how to balance the equation to receive this answer.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You balanced it correctly! Nice!

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh wait, you just saw the answer but did not attempt it successfully?

  7. Meehan98
    • one year ago
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    Yes, I have the answer, but I don't know what to do in order to get to that balanced equation.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is my way. Count the number and write on both sides. Start both of each element and put it on the left side. I will put a number next to the ones in the left by separating it with a comma. Left side (reactants) Right side(Products) 1,3 Cu 3 2,6 Cl 1,6 3,6 K 1,6 1,2 P 2 4,8 O 8 Now lets start and try to make it equal by multiplying. There is more Cu in the right so multiply the left side where Cu is at by 3. There I would put the comma followed by 3. But that would make Cl 6, so I put a comma next to the 2 in Cl, then put 6 Next multiply the Cl in the right side by 6. That makes six K also Multiply K by 2 in the left side to make it equal That would make two P and eight O. See. It all equals out. You just need practice. No easier way then practice.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (The number of elements before), (the number of each elements after multiplying it)

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It is pretty confusing at first, but do you know what is true for an equation to be balanced?

  11. Meehan98
    • one year ago
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    Okay, this helped immensely!!! Thank you! Yes, the elements must have the same number on each side of the equation in order for it to be balanced.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Glad you understood! Good luck!

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