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AmTran_Bus

  • one year ago

If z=1+i, then the magnitude of z is sqrt(2). What is the phase angle of z?

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  1. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    Tan y/x. Book says 1, isnt it real/imag? How did they get that?

  2. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    I know they got the mag. by mult. by conjugate.

  3. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441485844188:dw|

  4. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Just set up a triangle I guess :)

  5. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441485936796:dw|

  6. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    Hum. Ok. The book just says use y/x (pchem book). If z=x+iy, and the mag is sqrt 2, can you not just say y/x?

  7. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    It says =1 which in angle terms is 45.

  8. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Yes, but I thought you were having trouble with it conceptually :P so i went into a little more detail lol

  9. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    Thanks for that! I actually understand the graph! Been doing Pchem all day and brain fried.

  10. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441486086282:dw|

  11. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Therefore: \(\large\rm arctan\left(\frac{y}{x}\right)=\theta\)

  12. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Ya I guess we gotta be careful with our y, right? We're thinking of our complex number \(\large\rm z=x+iy\) So the i is not included in the y. It's just the distance in that direction. So ya y=1, good good

  13. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    arctan (1/1) does not give 45 degrees though.

  14. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    no? :o it should. are you in radians, maybe it's spitting out pi/4 as a decimal value

  15. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    Bless you, Zepdrix.

  16. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    silly bus -_- we're gonna downgrade you to a shortbus some day

  17. AmTran_Bus
    • one year ago
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    I need to be.

  18. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    XD

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