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Loser66

  • one year ago

@ganeshie8 How can I write a definition of a square in terms of points, lines, parallel, perpendicular and congruence? Please, help I don't want to describe it.

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  1. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I have "incidence" also.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Haha! I don't want to either. But that's not a good reason to ask others to do it for you.

  3. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @ospreytriple If I don't know how to, I am a right to ask. A bunch of definition on internet, right?

  4. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    and I am not as good as you to know everything. :)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry if I offended you @Loser66 . I was commenting on your statement "I don't want to describe it."

  6. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Yes, you did offend me. hehehe... but I am cool because you point out how stupid I am and it is true.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You know what a square is. I would start b y writing something out in plain English and then working the mathematical terminology into it.

  8. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    A pair of parallel lines perpendicular to another pair of parallel lines at 4 points with equidistant sides forms a geometry called a square. right?

  9. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    hahaha.... my bad English!!

  10. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    teamviewer?

  11. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    again? yes.

  12. BloomLocke367
    • one year ago
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    I already helped you with this question..

  13. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @BloomLocke367 I appreciate what you did but I didn't satisfy with it.

  14. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    |x| = a and |y| = a does that work

  15. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    if not, may i know what exactly are you looking for

  16. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    if you say |x|, then I must define the | | term.

  17. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    We have "congruence" is undefined term on our definition.

  18. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    go ahead define them shouldnt be hard

  19. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    so, before giving out the definition of a square, I must add the definition of | | term, rightg?

  20. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    if so, why not a quadrilateral or a rhombus? It is quite easier, right?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How about defining the four vertices as \((x_1, y_1), (x_2, y_2), (x_3, y_3), x_4, y_4)\) such that \(x_1=x_3\), \(x_2=x_4\), \(y_1=y_2\), and \(y_3=y_4\). Then you have to add the appropriate line segment connecting the correct vertices. That do it?

  22. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
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    let me just tag @Concentrationalizing

  23. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Thanks

  24. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441560226473:dw|

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hate to be a nitpicker, but the sides of a square are line segments, not lines.|dw:1441560429401:dw|Is line segment not permissible in the definition?

  26. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I did for a circle, it is a set of points whose equidistant from a fixed point

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You might want to constrain your circle definition to a 2-dimensional figure. Otherwise, you'll end up with a sphere.

  28. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441560688148:dw|

  29. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    ok, thanks for the tip. I will add 2D and 3D in

  30. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Think of my definition of a square? I am not a native American so that It is hard for me to jot down the definition of something. hehehe....

  31. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    @Loser66 do you have enough now or do you still need more?

  32. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Surely I need as much as possible.

  33. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    what I had before a square is a set of 4 points such that when they are connected by lines creates 2 sets of parallel lines that are perpendicular to each other and all 4 segments are the same lengths.

  34. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    Thank you so much.

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Couple of issues I can see:|dw:1441562290366:dw|Four points connected by line segments? Also, is a square really a set of four points? Or is it a set of four line segments?

  36. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    4 points when connected by lines is that what you disagree with ?

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes. Which points are connected to which other points?

  38. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    a square is the shape of the figure produced when ....

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You might consider beginning with " a 2D geometric figure consisting of four congruent line segments..."

  40. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    the segments you get after you have the points and connect them

  41. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @ospreytriple Yes, I did. I constrain them in 2 D, so that the parallel lines are in the same plane and they don't turn to the skew lines in 3D

  42. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    very good to include it is a 2D figure produced when.....

  43. triciaal
    • one year ago
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    is @ospreytriple the only one who did not see a square from my description?

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "...arranged such that each endpoint is connected to exactly one other endpoint and each line segment is perpendicular to the two line segments to which it is connected." What do you think?

  45. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    @triciaal I don't think so, he is just figure out how a reader can critique your definition. That is the way we project a geometry.

  46. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    oh, my bad, I got you

  47. Loser66
    • one year ago
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    I have to go now. If you guys have another guidance. please, let it here. I will pick it later. Thanks in advance.

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