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anonymous

  • one year ago

In order for a solute to dissolve in a solvent, what must be true? A. The attractive forces in a solute need to be broken. B. The attractive forces in a solute must be increased. C. The attractive forces in a solute must be greater than the attractive forces in the solvent. D. The attractive forces in a solvent must be increased.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What's it mean to dissolve? I'm sure you've seen what happens when you put salt in water, it appears as if it disappears. But it's not disappearing! So what's happening? Well imagine for a second that you don't put the salt into water, but instead you put it on a table and start smashing it with a hammer. The already tiny salt crystals are going to get even tinier, and it's harder to see them case you've broken them all apart. Now imagine you could shrink down, and bring your hammer with you so that the salt crystals are actually giant rocks compared to you, and then start breaking down these salt crystals more, eventually you'd have a lot of really finely broken up salt and when you unshrunk back to normal all the salt pieces would be like little hard-to see bits of dust. So the main thing is, recognize that it took some strength to break the salt apart, this is basically what water is doing when it dissolves the salt (although it doesn't use hammers of course, it uses the electric force). So if the force of the solvent isn't strong enough to rip apart all the salt, then it won't dissolve away

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @woodward explained it perfectly

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I think it's also because of the fact that the particles of solute have to be polar like the solvent as well. @Woodward does this electric force also depend on say whether the solute is polar or not?

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