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anonymous

  • one year ago

Wouldnt this be D? Who Needs Sleep? You Do! You may think the best way to prepare for a tough exam is to stay up late the night before, cramming the information, poring over notes and textbooks. The truth is, though, studies have found that if you want to have good recall, and do well on tough tasks like tests, you need to get a good night's sleep.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    During sleep, your brain uses this "down" time to process things you have learned. According to Harvard's Healthy Sleep website (healthysleep.med.harvard.edu), when we have gone without sleep for some time, "our focus, attention, and vigilance drift, making it more difficult to receive information" (Sleep, 1). We lose our ability to remember or recall previously learned information if we do not get enough sleep. The article further states that researchers believe going without sleep can reduce your ability to learn new things.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    According to the article, learning happens in three phases. The first, acquisition, occurs when new information is introduced to the brain. This new information may be something you learn in class, something you read in a textbook, or a technique you learn from another person. The second phase, consolidation, is a process that happens as your brain works to make the memory of that information stable, or solidified. Finally, recall is the phase in which you have the ability to remember and use the information that you acquired and then consolidated in the first two phases. Researchers believe that sleep enables memory consolidation by strengthening the connections that make up our memories. Studies are still being conducted to fully test the idea that being sleep deprived may limit your ability to learn. However, most experts agree that getting adequate sleep is vital to your ability to learn and remember. Last-minute studying can't be helped sometimes, it's true. Just remember, though, that most of what you review in those last moments before the test will not "stick" in your memory banks if you do not also have good sleep habits.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sleep, Learning, and Memory," Healthy Sleep, Harvard Medical School. December 18, 2007. Web. July, 2014. Which line from the text suggests that the author has some sympathy for those having to study for exams? Your brain uses this "down" time to process things. Going without sleep can reduce your ability to learn new things. According to the article, learning happens in three phases. Last-minute studying can't be helped sometimes, it's true.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @paki

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