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rainbow_rocks03

  • one year ago

PLZ PLZ PLZ PLZ HELP ME REALLY BAD!

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  1. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    @Mertsj @Luigi0210 @nincompoop

  2. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    can't log in.

  3. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    Can't log into what?

  4. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    @Jaynator495 @sweetburger @Here_to_Help15 @Mertsj @nincompoop @Luigi0210

  5. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    When I click on your link I get a message that says I have to log in. Try it and see.

  6. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    Oh I didn't know that it wouldn't work...it works for me cause I go to the school and I am logged in

  7. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    hang on real quick

  8. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    When you write a research report, you learn about the topic by reading what other people have written about it. You will look at different kinds of sources to find information. Your sources will include printed sources, such as books and articles, as well as online sources. A bibliography is a list of sources that provide information you will use in your research report. In your bibliography, you list any books, articles, or Web sites you used. There are two reasons why it is important to create a bibliography: 1. It is a way to give other writers credit for their words and ideas. 2. It gives the reader a way to check the information in your report and find out more about the topic. What Is Included in a Bibliography: In addition to listing the title and author of a source, your bibliography will include some information that will help a reader find the source easily. Below you will find examples of each type of source and the information you need to include. Examples of Proper Format Book List the title and author of the book. (The title should be underlined or in italics.) Then list the publisher and the year the book was published. This information is usually listed on the first page after the title page inside the book. Your Learning Coach can help you locate the information. EXAMPLE The Great Depression by Jennifer Brown. Schoolhouse Learning Inc., 2007. Article List the title and author of the article. The article title should be in quotation marks. Then list the name of the magazine or newspaper and the date the issue was published. (The name of the magazine or newspaper should be underlined or in italics.) Then list the page numbers for the article. EXAMPLES Magazine © 2009 Connections Education LLC. All rights reserved. “Franklin Roosevelt’s New Deal” by Jorge Ramirez. History for Kids, July 2008. Pages 20–25. Newspaper “Stock Market Crash Devastates Nation” by Bob Winters. Pleasantville Times, October 29, 1929. Pages A1–A3. Web Site Listing information about Web sites in your bibliography can be a little trickier than listing information for other kinds of sources. That is because there are many different types of sites, and they don’t always follow the same format. Keep in mind that the point of a bibliography is to show where you found information and help a reader locate the information easily. When you list a Web site in your bibliography, include as many of the following details as you can: • the URL, or address, of the Web site • the name of the Web site • the organization that maintains the Web site • for articles on a Web site, the title and author of the article, if available • the date you went to the site and got the information EXAMPLES http://ea.grolier.com/cgi-bin/article?assetid=0183650-00 from Grolier Online. Maintained by Grolier. “Great Depression” by H.J. Thorkelson. Accessed August 18, 2008. http://memory.loc.gov/learn/lessons/99/fear/poem2.html from The Learning Page. Maintained by The Library of Congress. “A Graduation Poem for Two” Accessed July 9, 2009 http://streaming.discoveryeducation.com/ from Discovery Education. Maintained by Discovery Education. “4-H Clubs” Accessed July 9, 2009

  9. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    Texas State History: Grade 7 Texas Almanac Portfolio Project How Would You Represent Texas’s Regions in an Almanac? An almanac is a reference book that contains information about a place. The information may cover astronomy, weather, economics, or agriculture. The Texas Almanac is published every two years. It contains information about topics such as culture, education, and government. Imagine that you have been invited to serve as a contributing writer for the next edition of the Texas Almanac. Description For this project, you will make five pages for the Texas Almanac, one on each of Texas’s regions. Click on the link to the Texas Almanac Web site to view several sample almanac pages. http://www.texasalmanac.com/ This link is to the Texas Almanac, a publication of the Texas State Historical Association (www.tshaonline.org) Your portfolio assignment has 4 steps: Researching Texas’s regions Analyzing your research Making almanac pages Compiling a list of sources Step 1: Research Research Texas’s regions and your own community. • Coastal Plains Region • North Central Plains Region • Great Plains Region • Mountains and Basins Region • Your city or community You will need to find information on 6 of the following topics to complete each of your five almanac pages: • absolute and relative location • agriculture • business and industry • cities or urban centers • climate or weather • communication • economy • elevation • environment • human characteristics or factors • human/environmental interaction • immigration or migration © 2009 Connections Academy, LLC. All Rights Reserved • irrigation or water resources • landforms • mineral resources • natural resources • physical characteristics or factors • politics • population • social development • transportation • vegetation • wildlife You can use note cards, type your notes on the computer, or use some other method of note taking. There are many sources of information about Texas, including your textbook, Discovery Education™, and Grolier Online® (linked from your LMS home page). Below is a list of other resources: • Texas Almanac http://www.texasalmanac.com/ This link is to the Texas Almanac, a publication of the Texas State Historical Association (www.tshaonline.org) • Texas Parks and Wildlife http://www.tpwd.state.tx.us/kids/ You will need to include at least one primary source in your pages. Primary sources may include (but are not limited to) the following ideas: • an image of an artifact from an area • quotation from an autobiography, journal, or diary • interview with an expert, visitor, resident Step 2: Research Analysis Before you make your almanac pages, reflect on the information you learned while researching Texas. Write down your thoughts on the following questions; you will need the answers to complete your almanac pages. • How can you best organize your information to present it in an attractive way? • Are your facts accurate and interesting? • What have you learned about Texas? Step 3: Almanac Pages Now, make your almanac pages. The editors have asked that you create five pages for the almanac. Each page will address one of the following five topics: • Coastal Plains Region • North Central Plains Region • Great Plains Region • Mountains and Basins Region • Your city or community © 2009 Connections Academy, LLC. All Rights Reserved Each page must contain at least one of the following types of graphcs: • photographs, drawings, or illustrations • maps • graphs • charts • models or diagrams Note: You must not use the same graphic twice. Each page must provide brief information (a few complete sentences) on six of the topics you researched. Include at least one primary source in your pages. Primary sources may include (but are not limited to) the following ideas: • an image of an artifact from an area • quotation from an autobiography, journal, or diary • interview with an expert, visitor, resident Step 4: Compiling a list of sources Include a list of sources at the end of your document. For more information on how to write a bibliography, or list of sources, click on the link in the lesson

  10. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    Your first step is to do research.

  11. Mertsj
    • one year ago
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    This is a huge project and is going to take many hours and LOTS of notes.

  12. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    IDK how to make this screen smaller. :(

  13. rainbow_rocks03
    • one year ago
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    Oh wait IDK why I am posting this I think got this...sorry if I inrtupted you.

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