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anonymous

  • one year ago

help

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  1. Christian_10_
    • one year ago
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    With?...

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    reading

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well u need to show us the problem

  4. Christian_10_
    • one year ago
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    :)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Rosen’s first paragraph doesn’t even talk about social media—or does it? She mentions portraits, which were paintings of people’s faces from centuries ago. So what does that have to do with social media? Take a close look at this sentence from the paragraph: "A marker of wealth and a bid for immortality, portraits offer intriguing hints about the daily life of their subjects – professions, ambitions, attitudes, and, most importantly, social standing." Though Rosen is writing about paintings from a long time ago, some of this sounds familiar. On social media, don't you learn something about the person from his or her profile pictures?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The article says profile pictures are different from portraits because they last longer than portraits they don't last as long as portraits they never look as nice as portraits they are usually out of focus Question 2 (Multiple Choice Worth 2 points) Rosen cites which networking study in her article? The Small World Experiment The Kevin Bacon Trial The Last Person Standing Survey The One-to-One Ratio Research

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wouldnt 1 be B

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yup

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    jk idk lol

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "For centuries, the rich and the powerful documented their existence and their status through painted portraits. A marker of wealth and a bid for immortality, portraits offer intriguing hints about the daily life of their subjects – professions, ambitions, attitudes, and, most importantly, social standing. Such portraits, as German art historian Hans Belting has argued, can be understood as "painted anthropology," with much to teach us, both intentionally and unintentionally, about the culture in which they were created."

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The article says profile pictures are different from portraits because they last longer than portraits they don't last as long as portraits they never look as nice as portraits they are usually out of focus

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