Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Whats the trick for knowing which ( ) or [ ] go where in interval notation?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Like... (- infinity sign, infinity sign) (- infinity sign, -1] (-3,0] [-1,8)
BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
Let's draw a number line with these four special numbers marked: -x <------o----o----o----o----0----o----o----o----o------> +x -3 -1 1 3 The trick is to look at the sign (+ or -) of your expression in each one of the intervals where nothing changes sign from + to - or back. These intervals are "up to but not including -3", "strictly between -3 and -1", etc. There are 5 of them. As an example, let's see what happens between -1 and +1. The numerator has one positive factor and one negative factor. The same is true for the denominator. So both numerator and denominator are negative, making the fraction > 0. Now we know that it is >= 0 in the interval (-1,+1). Remember the fraction is 0 for x=-1 and undefined for +1, so we write [-1,+1); the square cornered bracket on the left shows -1 IS IN the interval we are talking about where the fraction is >= zero. With me so far? Now do this kind of analysis about the 4 other sub-intervals to see what happens. As for the graph for such a problem, just draw on the number line to show what x values are included. There are two ways to show that an end point is or isn't included in the graph. Some books use "[" and "(" for this and some use a filled-dot and hollow-dot for it. Look in your book. I hope this helps.
BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
i am tired as heck after having to type that lol

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BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
Please medal and fan if this helps you
welshfella
  • welshfella
note when one of the numbers infinity or - infinity it's always a '(' or ')'
BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
Yep
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Um what?
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
I have no clue what dot things your talking about. I dont have a book to look at
BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
if you read everything outloud to yourself it will make sense
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
My examples show ( ) and [ ]
BishopPatton
  • BishopPatton
That is all i can do to help. i hope you understand
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
I rather no draw a number line for every problem I do.. Is there a easier way
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
not *
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
It doesnt matter if I read it allowed or not I dont understand anything you said.
welshfella
  • welshfella
one of your examples is (-3,0] that means 'greater than -3 and less than and including 0'.
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Okay I get that.. And my examples were just to show someone what Im talking about
welshfella
  • welshfella
so are you happy with the answers given?
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Um not really.. Im still where I was before.. Can you maybe give me an example to solve or something? Im working with domain and range right now
welshfella
  • welshfella
ok so what does [ , INf sign) mean
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
? Like [1, infinity sign) ??
welshfella
  • welshfella
yes
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Okay.. [ means less than and including 1.. ) means greater than infinity
welshfella
  • welshfella
No It means greater than and including 1 and up to infinity
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
I dont get it then
welshfella
  • welshfella
- in other words all numbers from and including 1 and going on infinaiely
welshfella
  • welshfella
well try an easy one {3 , 6) this is all numbers greater than and including 3 and less than 6 the [ means that 3 is included and the ) at the end means 6 is NOT included
welshfella
  • welshfella
that the square bracket [
welshfella
  • welshfella
means 'included'
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
1 Attachment
welshfella
  • welshfella
also its important to remember that its a continuum of numbers between these to values not just 4 and 5 its 3.9011, 5.5 , 5.9999 and whatever
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
This is what im working on. I really understand what you just said. Im trying to but its not making any sense to me
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
I dont care about that. I just want to know how to know where to put () and []
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
I assumed there was some trick people knew that helped them figure it out quick.
triciaal
  • triciaal
when you have square it includes the end values
welshfella
  • welshfella
the domain is all the values of x that the function can take the empty circle means that that values of x is not included and the filled means that values of x is included.
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Yes..
welshfella
  • welshfella
yes the domain for that function is (-3,0]
welshfella
  • welshfella
the x -3 has the emplty circle but x = 0 has filled one
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Yeah.. But how do you know where to put the 9 and ] at??
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
( ] **
welshfella
  • welshfella
well ( when the number is not included - so it comes before the -3
welshfella
  • welshfella
|dw:1441818059986:dw|
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Um okay I think I understand that..
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
So the range would be (5,-4] ??
welshfella
  • welshfella
the lowest value of y comes first in the range this is -5 and the highest is 5
welshfella
  • welshfella
Sorry lowest is -4
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
So [-4,5)
welshfella
  • welshfella
yes
welshfella
  • welshfella
-4 is included but 5 is not
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Okay I think I understand
welshfella
  • welshfella
good
Destinyyyy
  • Destinyyyy
Thank you.

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