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anonymous

  • one year ago

help

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @champ16

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Rosen connects the idea of how our social media profile pictures are like "online self-portraits," much like the painted portraits of olden days. She talks about the similarities but also points out how they are different. Let’s take a look at this sentence again: "Like painters constantly retouching their work, we alter, update, and tweak our online self-portraits; but as digital objects they are far more ephemeral than oil on canvas." Rosen describes our social media pages as nothing more than interactive portraits that we post online. But what is this "ephemeral" word? Let's take a closer look at it because it describes online self-portraits (selfies!), which are really important in social media. Things we know Things we know bullet 1 Rosen says our profile pictures are more ephemeral than paintings. Things we know bullet 2 This means there is a difference between online postings and portraits. Things we know bullet 3 One difference is that profiles are online, while paintings are on canvas. Things we know bullet 4 Canvas lasts a long time without changing, while profiles can be changed completely in a moment

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    According to the article, how long have people been studying social networks? Since at least 1993 Since at least 1802 Since at least 2011 Since at least 1967

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wouldnt this be D

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    d or a

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    though d seems right

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    alright im going with D and can you help me with another one?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure thing

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "It is worth pausing for a moment to reflect on the curious use of the word networking to describe this new form of human interaction. Social networking websites "connect" users with a network – literally, a computer network. But the verb to network has long been used to describe an act of intentional social connecting, especially for professionals seeking career-boosting contacts. When the word first came into circulation in the 1970s, computer networks were rare and mysterious. Back then, "network" usually referred to television. But social scientists were already using the notion of networks and nodes to map out human relations and calculate just how closely we are connected. In 1967, Harvard sociologist and psychologist Stanley Milgram, best known for his earlier Yale experiments on obedience to authority, published the results of a study about social connection that he called the "small world experiment." "Given any two people in the world, person X and person Z," he asked, "how many intermediate acquaintance links are needed before X and Z are connected?" Milgram's research, which involved sending out a kind of chain letter and tracing its journey to a particular target person, yielded an average number of 5.5 connections. The idea that we are all connected by "six degrees of separation" (a phrase later popularized by playwright John Guare) is now conventional wisdom."

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "Milgram's research, which involved sending out a kind of chain letter and tracing its journey to a particular target person, yielded an average number of 5.5 connections."

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Which of the following is an example of a changing social norm Rosen described in her article? Communicating with family regularly Researching unknown information Writing long articles about society Announcing life changes online Which of the following is the best definition of the term "social norms," as it is used in the article? Strange new ideas and practices Common rules and standards Fears and beliefs of different cultures Decisions made alone by one person

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A for the first one and B for 2?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Aly.mac101

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