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anonymous

  • one year ago

How do I explain this?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1441828194641:dw|

  2. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    I'm sorry, I don't know your answer, since I'm good with inorganic chemistry only

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    it is okay!! what about these two ?|dw:1441828432512:dw|

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    * observe a mass *NaCl to be :)

  5. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    problem #1 here the sum of percentages is equal to 110%, which is impossible

  6. Michele_Laino
    • one year ago
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    @rvc

  7. aaronq
    • one year ago
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    You could separate \(\sf ZnCl_2\) and cyclohexane by quite a few ways, but if you want to use their physical differences, think about melting point, boiling point, etc. look these up online if you need to.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The very first one is simple, \(ZnCl_2\) doesn't even dissolve in cyclohexane so you can filter it out and throw away the cyclohexane. If you're crazy and want to throw away the \(ZnCl_2\) and keep the cyclohexane, add water and you can easily take the cyclohexane off the top cause it'll float and the water will dissolve the hygroscopic zinc chloride. But you were probably using the cyclohexane to keep the zinc chloride dry in the first place so this would be a waste, cause cyclohexane is fairly cheaply made from hydrogenating benzene in high yield.

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