anonymous
  • anonymous
(3 pt) Which statement correctly explains whether or not this equation is a balanced equation? KMnO4 + HCl → KCl + MnCl2 + H2O + Cl2 A. The equation is not balanced because the number of atoms of each element on the left is not equal to their numbers on the right. B. The equation is not balanced because there are not any numbers in front of the compounds. C. The equation is balanced because it has equal amounts of reactants and products. D. The equation is balanced because it has one of each compound.
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
You might get more help if you post this in the Chemistry section of OpenStudy. :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
But, I know how to balance chemical equations, so let's see;
anonymous
  • anonymous
i did

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More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
What do you think the answer is, just be look at the elements on each side?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Just by*
anonymous
  • anonymous
d
anonymous
  • anonymous
Let's look at the law of conservation of mass. It states that matter cannot be created nor destroyed. In Chemical reactions, matter cannot be created (Added to the mass of the product that the reactants did not originally have) or destroyed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
KMnO4 + HCl → KCl + MnCl2 + H2O + Cl2 Do you think the product mass is greater than the reactant mass?
anonymous
  • anonymous
In simpler terms, does each side have an equal amount of atoms?
anonymous
  • anonymous
uh
anonymous
  • anonymous
To make it easier, look at each element one by one on both sides of the Reaction to determine if they are equal. That includes Chlorine, Potassium, Hydrogen, and Mn
anonymous
  • anonymous
KKKKK
anonymous
  • anonymous
How many K's are on the left compared to the right?
anonymous
  • anonymous
3
anonymous
  • anonymous
KMnO4 + HCl → KCl + MnCl2 + H2O + Cl2 Let me break it down a bit for ya. Since there are are 0 coefficients visible in this equation, it is always safe to assume that it the coefficient is 1. The coefficient is what's in front of a molecule or compound, and always affect each element in that compound. The subscript next to each element is the amount of atoms that specific element that it's right next to have. On the left side of the equation, you have KMnO4 + HCl. K has 1 atom since it is no subscript right next to it or coefficient in front of its molecule. So does Mn. O4 has for atoms since it has a 4 subscript next to it. Now we have HCl; H is one hydrogen atom, and Cl is one Chlorine Atom. This is a reactant side. Are you following so far?
anonymous
  • anonymous
mhm
anonymous
  • anonymous
For an example of HCl was 2HCl, both H and Cl would have 2 atoms total since the coefficient is two. The coefficient in this hypothetical question, multiplied by the original number of atoms (1 H, 1Cl) would make that reactant have 2 of both Hydrogen and Chlorine.
anonymous
  • anonymous
KCl + MnCl2 + H2O + Cl2, can you count how many atoms each element has seperately? K: Cl Mn: H: O
anonymous
  • anonymous
i'm CONFUSEDDDDDD
anonymous
  • anonymous
Where are you confused at?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Where are you confused at?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Let me teach you like my teacher taught me: Imagine that you have a regular Ol' Double Cheeseburger. This Cheeseburger has 2 pieces of bread, 2 hamburger patties, 1 slice of cheese, and One slice a Lettuce. You want to follow this exact recipe using only the ingredients in the Double Cheeseburger that is already so that you already have, so that you can instead make a TRIPLE cheese burger with 3 slices of cheese and 3 hamburger patties. So your first Cheeseburger has 2 pieces of bread, 2 hamburger patties, 1 slice of cheese and One slice of lettuce and 1 piece of lettuce. Can you make a triple cheeseburger given only the ingredients required for this double cheeseburger?
anonymous
  • anonymous
*that you already have*
anonymous
  • anonymous
And only one slice of lettuce. Ignore the double of (One piece of lettuce)
anonymous
  • anonymous
What do you think the answer is to that riddle?
anonymous
  • anonymous
NO :>(
anonymous
  • anonymous
Correcto. Why do you think you can't?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Why is it impossible to make a triple cheeseburger under these conditions?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Your answer is right, but explain why it's correct.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Think of the law of conservation of matter. You can't make a triple cheeseburger under these conditions because you would have to "magically" create another hamburger and slice of cheese, which would be illogical, since you only had 2 slices of cheese and patties to start off with. You understand so far?
anonymous
  • anonymous
That would make the triple cheeseburger weigh more than the double cheeseburger, although you only used the ingredient that the double cheeseburger had.
anonymous
  • anonymous
tahanks tho
anonymous
  • anonymous
This same rule applies to Balancing chemical equations. If you start off with one mass, you cannot end up with a different mass, since you only had the reactants at the start of the equaton to work with.
anonymous
  • anonymous
np by the way.
anonymous
  • anonymous
KMnO4 + HCl → KCl + MnCl2 + H2O + Cl2 Lets look back at this equation. Let me help you out. The number of K's on each side is equal to 1. You see exactly 1 K atom on the reactant side of the equation and 1 K on the product side. What about Chlorine and Hydrogen? Is there more Chlorine and hydrogen on the product side of the equation than the Reactant side?

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