A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

cutiecomittee123

  • one year ago

What geometric principal allows us to define trigonometric functions as ratios of sides of triangles and to be confident that they are indeed functions? That is, how do we know that the value of each angle put into a trigonometric function results in exactly one output value

  • This Question is Closed
  1. zepdrix
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @ganeshie8 @Michele_Laino @freckles What in the blazes are they asking here? 0_o

  2. cutiecomittee123
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    isnt it just the pythagorean theorum

  3. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think because the angle formed is a function of the radius, the radius is the length

  4. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    I think the geometric principal that allows us to be confident that "each angle produces an unique trig output" is the concept of "similar triangles".

  5. ganeshie8
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 4

    For example, consider all the similar triangles with angles : \(40,50,90\) Since the triangles are similar, the corresponding sides form a proportion. So no matter what the scale factor is, the trig ratio for a particular angle is always same.

  6. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    agree with @ganeshie8 you solved my "missing piece" the trig ratio is a comparison of the lengths and the similar figures will "equate" the different lengths so the trig ratio for a particular angle will always be the same

  7. triciaal
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think Pythagoras theorem allows us to use similar figures in the first place.

  8. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.