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anonymous

  • one year ago

Pedro has created the function f(x) = 4x - 3 ------- 2 to represent the number of assignments he has completed, where x represents the number of weeks in the corse. Pedro discovers that, using the inverse function to solve for x = 30, he can predict when he will have 30 assignments completed. Explain to Pedro how to accomplish this, using complete sentences.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @PeterPan Here it is genius :P

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Essays? But that's so boring -_-

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Tell me about it -_- Thankfully there were only 3, this is my last one.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, I'm not a good speaker, so I'll give you the gist of it and leave it to you to turn a few sentences into a bloody novel so are you ready? :D

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sounds good

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    To get the inverse of a function Like f(x) = 4x - 16 for instance

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    If it wasn't an inverse problem I could do it but I don't understand how to solve inverse problems.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    haha You'll never be able to explain it to Pedro (that's Spanish for Peter, right? :| ) if you don't know it yourself :P So let me show you an example:

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have no idea, probably though. Good point, okay.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry about that, internet in the second star could be a bit iffy at times haha Getting the inverse of a function is easy enough in theory, even though it's not always so in practice. Thankfully, linear equations are always easy. So... \[\large f(x) = 4x - 16\] First step and this is optional, but I always do it (in my head at least) to make things look nicer, and that's to replace f(x) with y \[\large \color{red}{y} = 4x-16\]

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Got it?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes. And then you do it again but with x so it's x = 4y - 16, right?

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    That's right :D But you're going to have to say that properly, though, and clearly (unlike that idiot who wrote that video game problem from last time ugh) So say that you will switch x and y. \[\large \color{blue}x = 4\color{blue}y - 16 \]

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    lol Then you add 16 to both sides?

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So it should look like... |dw:1441987136393:dw|

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @texaschic101 Can you help me please? The person who was helping me is having internet problems ._.

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I have a name, you know :P

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well I don't know it :P

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It's Kurt haha Anyway, you did it correctly, just one more final touch ^^

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    You replaced f(x) with y. Now we replace y. With... \[\Large f^{-1}(x) = \frac{x+16}{4}\]

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hey... Are you still there?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah sorry. I accidentally closed the tab. Okay, that makes sense... Now how do I put it into the problem that they gave me?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Just do the same, and use Pedro's bloody function :D

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay so... f(x) =4x - 3/2 y = 4x - 3 / 2 x = 4y - 3 / 2 then add 3 to each side?

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Nope, not quite. \[\Large x = \frac{4y-3}2\] You kind of have to get rid of that 2 in the bottom, first. Try multiplying both sides by 2.

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So we would cancel out the 2 all together?

  27. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Yup, while multiplying the left x with a 2. HAHA account back to normal... I feel more formal already (even though I'm not LOL)

  28. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    \[\Large \color{red}2\cdot x = \frac{4y-3}2\cdot \color{blue}2\]

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm lost .-. It's harder when it's already in a fraction.

  30. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    You're lost? I thought your name was Hayley :D HAHA Don't be afraid of fractions, they're just numbers trying to look tough ^^ In fact, multiplying the 2 get rid of the fraction bar: \[\Large 2x = \frac{4y-3}{\cancel{2}}\cdot \cancel{2}\]\[\Large 2x = 4y - 3\]

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah yeah, whatever :P lol Okay... how do you ride of the 4 in the y? Don't we need a variable all by itself?

  32. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    Sshh... One at a time, Miss lost. First, your original idea. We add three to both sides to remove that 3. We couldn't do it earlier because, well, there was a denominator. But now there isn't. So... add the 3 and you get...?

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    OH OH, I got it now!! So... |dw:1441989280403:dw|

  34. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    And the final touch \[\Large f^{-1}(x) = \frac{2x + 3}4\] and Pedro can stick that up his... well, wherever he does his maths HAHA Well done! Amazing Grace!! HAHA You once... were lost... but now... you're... well, something Good job ^^

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay! Thank you so much. You are a life saver... well grade saver I guess ^.^

  36. terenzreignz
    • one year ago
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    No problem. ^_^ I am like super smart, after all... AHAHAHAHA or maybe just a little :)

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Or a lot :P

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