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anonymous

  • one year ago

Volume of a given mass of a gas is doubled at atmospheric pressure if the temperature of a gas is changed from 75 degrees to: (A)150 degrees (B)423 degrees (C)75 degrees (D)37.5 degrees

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @arindameducationusc

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @irishboy123

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @plasmafuzer

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @taylorwhitez

  5. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    USE PV=NRT

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But i think Charles law is more applicable in it..is'nt it??? @arindameducationusc

  7. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    YES, P IS CONSTANT

  8. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    V is proportional to T. if V is doubled, T is doubled

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Then acc to you 150 should be the answer but my teacher told me 423 and i dont know how??

  10. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    hmmm.....

  11. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    any units given? like kelvin, Fahrenheit, Celsius?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    No....unit is not given so we have to give the answer on the same standard as in the question

  13. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    hmmm. confusing....

  14. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    @Michele_Laino @Robert136 @irishboy123 can help you,, don't worry!

  15. arindameducationusc
    • one year ago
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    Ya Even @Astrophysics can give a try.

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sure

  17. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    the answer is 243 |dw:1442394056979:dw|

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry buddy but not understanding why you are adding 273 as we havent been given any unit.???

  19. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    kelvin https://uk.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20110502085234AAwq8od

  20. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    Kelvin is an absolute scale

  21. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    got it to work yet?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Bro i know all that..but i am just saying that how you knew that 75 degrees in the question is in celsius scale not in kelvin...it can possibly be given in kelvin becoz we havent mentioned any unit in the answer also....... just ''degrees'' not any unit...so it means that we does'nt have to convert 75...

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So by keeping 75 how we can get to the answer..??

  24. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    to get you to the bottom of this, set T to zero in the ideal gas law see what you get

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Bro we have to find T2 and by putting T zero all the equation would be zero....i think the above question is a simple condition of Charles law nothing more thn that and the answer should be 150 according to me but my teacher told me thats not the answer answer is 423 and i was just wandering how the hell this can be the answer and i just supposed if there is a trick behind it so just want you to find that out...please...

  26. IrishBoy123
    • one year ago
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    really sorry mate, finally gave this the attention it deserves and i totally dig what you say here we have: |dw:1442512924916:dw| so #1 \[\frac{1 \times 1}{75K} = \frac{1 \times 2}{X}\] \[X = 2(75) = 150K \] or #2 \[\frac{1 \times 1}{75^oC+273} = \frac{1 \times 2}{X+273}\] \[X+273 = 2(75+273)\] \[X = 423K = 150^oC\] good spot!

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks a lot mate...really you are a genius

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