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anonymous

  • one year ago

A train leaves the station at 9:00 pm traveling at 36 miles per hour. A second train leaves the station at 10:00pm traveling at 42 miles per hour. At what time will both trains have traveled the same distance? A.) 4:00 am B.) 5:00 am C:) 6:00 am D:) 7:00

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  1. Baby_Bear69
    • one year ago
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    I could figure it up and give you the answer, but I do it the difficult way.. Idk how to explain

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I really need the answer I've been stuck for awhile. :/ please help!

  3. Baby_Bear69
    • one year ago
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    Basically im just making a chart. and as you add an hour, add 36 or 42 cause thats how many miles they go per hour

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay thanks :/ I tried that but I think I messed up

  5. Baby_Bear69
    • one year ago
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    okok i got it

  6. Baby_Bear69
    • one year ago
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    Its A

  7. Baby_Bear69
    • one year ago
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    can i get a medal please, just hit Best Response

  8. radar
    • one year ago
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    Just in case you are interested in a method to solve this: Distance = Rate (mph) times time (hours) or D=RT This is the relationship you use. For this problem, the distance traveled by first train will equal the distance traveled by second train.

  9. radar
    • one year ago
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    D (distance) of first train = speed of first train times the time that the train traveled D of 2nd train = speed of 2nd train times the time traveled by 2nd train. The unknown here is the times. We now resort to algebra.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    picking up from where @radar left off |dw:1442411649060:dw|

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    36t = 42(t - 1) 36t = 42t - 42 -6t = -42 t = 7 hours the trains have traveled the same distance 7 hours after the first train leaves the station. That's 4:00 am

  12. radar
    • one year ago
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    Let X = the amount of time traveled by first train. Since 2nd train left an hour later .....then..... X-1 = the amount of time traveled by 2nd train. Since the distance traveled at the point where they were at the same place is the same. 36X = 42(X-1) Now all that is required is to solve for x. Add the value obtained for x to the time that first train left and you will have the time where both trains traveled the same distance. PS For some reason there was a connection failure.

  13. radar
    • one year ago
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    Let X = the amount of time traveled by first train. Since 2nd train left an hour later .....then..... X-1 = the amount of time traveled by 2nd train. Since the distance traveled at the point where they were at the same place is the same. 36X = 42(X-1) Now all that is required is to solve for x. Add the value obtained for x to the time that first train left and you will have the time where both trains traveled the same distance. PS For some reason there was a connection failure.

  14. radar
    • one year ago
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    However, I see that @peachpi has provided an excellent solution.

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