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anonymous

  • one year ago

STuck? if cartesian equation of x= sint, y=cos^2t is = x^2 + y = 1... how does the graph in the range of -2pi <t<2pi end up being an upside down parabola with values that go beyond -1 and 1?

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  1. BAdhi
    • one year ago
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    is you r question, the graph being a parabola or having a range beyond -1 and 1?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442467120251:dw|

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So am I trying to graph with incorrect points or is my graph correct?

  4. BAdhi
    • one year ago
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    yes its clear that x can only take values between -1 and 1 since \(-1\leq \sin(t) \leq 1\) so your graph is correct

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so if my professor asked me to identify the behavior of the graph according to the cartesian equation I derived from these x and y functions... I could tell him that a particle traveling along the path of this graph would actually travel clockwise then bounce back and travel counterclockwise between the -1 and 1 on the x-axis..???? does that make sense?

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because thats' mainly my thing, Im trying to understand the behavior of how a particle would travel along this path. starting at -2pi and ending at 2pi.. and since my graph starts and ends at -1 and 1... would my conclusion be correct? (about the bouncing back and forth)

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    are you still there?

  8. BAdhi
    • one year ago
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    yes the idea of travelling is derived from the time - t So if we take the distance on x direction, the relationship of that with the time is given as \(x = \sin(t)\) so there itself it says that the x change in a oscillatory way

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok. fantastic!!!!!!! thank you. I just wanted to make sure I was on the right track. And you seem pretty confident. :) Thank you very much.

  10. BAdhi
    • one year ago
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    you are welcome

  11. BAdhi
    • one year ago
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    here what desmos.com give

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spraguer (Moderator)
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is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

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