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anonymous

  • one year ago

Think back to when you were a kid riding in the backseat of the car. Maybe you once had a milkshake in your hand when your mom hit the brakes. You were secured by your seat belt, but you jerked forward and the milkshake splashed all over the front seat…and your mom. That situation probably never happened to you. But think about something that has happened to you physically—a fall, a jump, an accident, or something you may have done hundreds of times in your favorite sport. Analyze the action and describe it in terms of Newton’s laws. Identify the initial conditions and the forces involved.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @angrybadger.exe @SamsungFanBoy @BloomLocke367 @johnweldon1993 @sleepyjess @jameshorton @Lourdes15R @awkwardpanda

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i will fan and medal you, i just seriously need help with this

  3. jameshorton
    • one year ago
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    ok

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so you will??

  5. jameshorton
    • one year ago
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    yep

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you so much

  7. jameshorton
    • one year ago
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    First law: When viewed in an inertial reference frame, an object either remains at rest or continues to move at a constant velocity, unless acted upon by an external force.[2][3] Second law: The vector sum of the external forces F on an object is equal to the mass m of that object multiplied by the acceleration vector a of the object: F = ma. Third law: When one body exerts a force on a second body, the second body simultaneously exerts a force equal in magnitude and opposite in direction on the first body.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you are the bomb

  9. jameshorton
    • one year ago
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    just ask me if you need any more help with questions

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