A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

anonymous

  • one year ago

If a die is rolled twice, what is the probability of rolling a 5 and then a 2? 1 36 B) 1 3 Eliminate C) 1 6 D) 2 36

  • This Question is Closed
  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    What is the question.

  2. texaschic101
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I have no idea what this says

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Me neither

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OHH. thanks

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I meant to type the question too.. Its If a die is rolled twice, what is the probability of rolling a 5 and then a 2?

  6. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    OK @kkittykat answer these 3 questions first: are the 2 instances of rolling the dice independent events? (that is for YOU to decide) what is the chance of rolling a 5 with one dice? what is the chance of rolling a 2 with one dice?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Idk about the independent events and 5 over 6 and 2 over 6 i think

  8. jameshorton
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So, prob. of rolling a 2: 1/6 You want the second roll to be anything but a 2. So that means you have a choice of 5 sides (1,3,4,5,6) and each of these sides has a 1/6 probability of showing up. Therefore the combined probability of rolling any of these five sides = 5*(1/6) = 5/6 Therefore, the probability of rolling a 2 then anything but a 2: = Prob. of rolling a 2 * Prob. of rolling anything but a 2 = 1/6 * 5/6 = 5/36...Answer

  9. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Well you need to decide about independent events do the results of the first throw influence the results of the second throw? if NOT then the events are independent And the probabilities you gave are wrong there are six possible results on a die - what is the chance of a particular one of those coming up (e.g. a 5?)

  10. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @jameshorton that is not the correct interpretation of the question you answer is not correct

  11. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    NO - first - it is against the rules second you do not 'need to get the maths grade' - you need to know HOW to do it if oyu did it th esame way a sjames then you did it wrong like James. answer this first: there are six possible results on a die - what is the chance of a particular one of those coming up (e.g. a 5?)

  12. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    going somewhere else for the answer is not 'HELP' if oyu spend your time at school copying other people's work then you are wasting the best opportunity of your life. I am prepared to spend as much time HELPING as you need - but no time giving you th eanswer try to understand the method - then you will have not only the answer to THIS question - but any others like it AND possibly an understanding of chance and odds that may save you a lot of time/money in REAL life. Eductation is YOUR choice - and it is not about grades it's about understanding

  13. MrNood
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I didn't say 'try again' I gave you 2 clues: first do the results of the first throw influence the results of the second throw? if NOT then the events are independent This is something that you may need to think about - but it is key to working out odds like this. If you throw for instance a 5 with the first throw then you are EQUALLY likely to throw a 5 with th e second throw - i.e. the first does NOT influence the second The chance of throwing a 5 is the same EVERY time oyu throw a die so the question is what is that chance? which is where my second hint comes in: there are six possible results on a die - what is the chance of a particular one of those coming up (e.g. a 5?) i.e what is the chance of any ONE out of SIX events happening?

  14. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.