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CherokeeGutierrez

  • one year ago

what is an atom?

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  1. CherokeeGutierrez
    • one year ago
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    @DarrenMadx

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the smallest particle of an element still having the characteristics of that element

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    John Dalton determined that the concept of atoms could be used to describe matter. In the 1800s, John Dalton, an English scientist, came up with an atomic theory of matter. Here are four points that are the cornerstone of his theory: All matter is made up of atoms. Atoms are very small, indivisible, indestructible particles. All atoms of a given element are identical in mass and other properties. Chemical compounds form when two or more kinds of atoms combine. Dalton suggested that chemical reactions happen when atoms combine, separate, or rearrange, but the atoms themselves do not change identity in the process.

  4. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    where did you get that from. there is no way you typed that so fast

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    :)

  6. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    so your not going to cite where you got that from?

  7. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    so you going to post your response anytime soon?

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    It's crazy because I'm actually doing a lesson on atoms. And as soon as she asked that i turned to my online class and this popped up

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  9. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    okay. my bad for being a little hostile

  10. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    Sorry for being mean to you @PrincestonA

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Bro you're awesome, You werent mean at all. Plus I'm bad in chem :( I might need your help someday.

  12. DarrenMadx
    • one year ago
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    and i will be happy to help you out

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @CherokeeGutierrez I hope you don't mind, but can I ask another question under your thread to @DarrenMadx. I have another Very important question open and I need it to stay open:( And it kinda realated:)

  14. CherokeeGutierrez
    • one year ago
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    its straight. you can

  15. CherokeeGutierrez
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1. In 1912, chemist Fritz Haber developed a process that combined nitrogen from the air with hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures to make ammonia. Specifically, the process involved combining one molecule of nitrogen gas (N2) with three molecules of hydrogen gas (H2) to get two molecules of ammonia (NH3). If you write this process in a symbol format, it looks like this: N2 + 3H2 → 2NH3 Explain whether this is a chemical or physical change, and why. Does it involve elements, compounds, mixtures, or pure substances? Also describe how many atoms are involved before and after. What do you notice about the number of atoms? Answer: Could you pretty please help me @DarrenMadx

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm sooo confused :(

  18. CherokeeGutierrez
    • one year ago
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    hey not to be rude but you should probely just ask this question in your own thing. cause i closed this already before you aksed me

  19. CherokeeGutierrez
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA

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