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anonymous

  • one year ago

@Cuanchi

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  1. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    ok

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1. In 1912, chemist Fritz Haber developed a process that combined nitrogen from the air with hydrogen at high temperatures and pressures to make ammonia. Specifically, the process involved combining one molecule of nitrogen gas (N2) with three molecules of hydrogen gas (H2) to get two molecules of ammonia (NH3). If you write this process in a symbol format, it looks like this: N2 + 3H2 → 2NH3 Explain whether this is a chemical or physical change, and why. Does it involve elements, compounds, mixtures, or pure substances? Also describe how many atoms are involved before and after. What do you notice about the number of atoms? Answer:

  3. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    OK What do you think is a chemical (change in the nature of the substance) or a physical (the substance still the same before and after the reaction?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i dont get the question your asking.

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know what they are

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    But are you asking me to tell you

  7. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    do you know the difference between chemical and physical change?

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    What you probably aren't familiar with is that Fritz Haber, probably one of the most famous/infamous chemists of all time also developed mustard gas, which was widely used in WWI by the german army, as a chemical weapon.

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    chemical change in matter or substances.

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    physical change in a substance doesn't change what the substance is

  11. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    good!!

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    this is unrelated though but I find it fascinating. Think about what's happening in the reaction, are new compounds being formed and what's happening @PrincestonA

  13. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    N2 + 3H2 → 2NH3 Does it involve elements, compounds, mixtures, or pure substances?

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Lol Awsome Fact @Photon336

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Nitrogen is an element

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA Arguably fritz haber is also considered a war criminal but because he invented the process to synthesize ammonia, he won the nobel prize for it.

  17. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 it is a very good coach too if you ever need help in Chemistry @PrincestonA

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Hydrogen is element

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    you're in good hands with @cuanchi

  20. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    ok, what about the others?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2NH3 is a mixture

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think:(

  23. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    no really

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ?

  25. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    the proportion of N and H in the NH3 are always constant it is a compound (like H2O is not a mixture of H and O)

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohhhhhhhh

  27. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    do you have any mixtures, or pure substances in the reaction?

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So its a physical change because its not changing what the substance is

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    And I know N2 and 3H2 Are elements

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2NH3 is a compound

  31. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    it is a chemical reaction!!!! the N2 and H2 are elements and the NH3 is a compound. All of them are pure substances.

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I swear i thought it was a chemical reaction but i thought it would be trick question

  33. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    how many atoms are involved before and after?

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok can you remind me which one is the atoms and molecules, is it the one before the element or after

  35. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    in the case of the N2 you have two atoms, in the case of the H2 you have two atoms too, but you need 3H2 then you have a total 6 atoms in the 3H2 you multiply the number in front of the symbol by the number under the symbol 8 and 8 are the same number of atoms before and after the reaction N2 + 3H2 → 2NH3 2 atoms of N and 6 atoms of H

  36. cuanchi
    • one year ago
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    I got to go see you later!!

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay Bye!!! See you later

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thanks soo much

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Im kinda still confused a little to the final answer. @Photon336 can you help me where the great @Cuanchi left off pleasee.

  40. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    first thing i'm going to ask you is what are you confused about @PrincestonA

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    About describing how many atoms are involved before and after, I know Cuanchi answered but I still don't quite get it

  42. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  43. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    well, do you know that in every chemical reaction: if we start out with a certain number of atoms, we must end off with that same number does this make sense? @PrincestonA

  44. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    let's say I have this reaction @princestonA i need you to follow along each step of the way, so i need you to participate. \[2A + 6B --> 2AB_{3}\] <-- we will work with that reaction In every chemical reaction, the number of atoms of reactants must equal the number of atoms of products. Does this make sense

  45. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I WANT you to LOOK at this reaction and tell me what you see

  46. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA ?

  47. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry im back Ok let me take a lot

  48. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    ok

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yea I still dont get it

  50. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    but what part of it do you not understand?

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    How did you get the 2AB3

  52. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA that's another example, to show you how to approach the problem

  53. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    The 3 part

  54. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    it's not the question that you were asked but I wanted to give you another example.

  55. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I know but how did you get the 3

  56. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 can you explain the eqaution a little bit more

  57. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    \[2A + 6B --> 2AB_{3} \] Let's look at the reactants please tell me how many atoms of A and B we have in the reactants?

  58. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2

  59. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Yes we have two reactants A and B. see those numbers in front of them? well because there is a 2 in front of A, we have 2 molecules of A how many molecules of B do we have in the reactants?

  60. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6 is in front of B?

  61. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    exactly

  62. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Now If we have 2 molecules of A, and 6 molecules of B in the reactants

  63. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    We MUST ALWAYS have the same amount of molecules on the product side.

  64. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Now tell me how many molecules of A and B are on the product side?

  65. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the product side is the front right?

  66. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yes \[Reactants --> products \] so on the right side of the arrow are the products

  67. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ooohhhhhhhhh

  68. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yes. so now tell me how many molecules of A and B are on the product side and WHY?

  69. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so there is 8

  70. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA you are correct there are 8 atoms total on the product side. can you show me why though?

  71. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    because there is2 atoms of N and 6 atoms of H

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and you add them

  73. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA in my example I used A and B there are 2 atoms of A and 6 atoms of B. yes. look at this does this make sense? |dw:1442611946494:dw|

  74. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    in total on the right side we have 6 atoms of B and 2 atoms of A

  75. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    ok i see

  76. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    I'll give you another one

  77. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442612178445:dw|

  78. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Tell me how many atoms of A and how many atoms of B are on the reactants side; then do the same for the product side.

  79. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    6 on the reactants side and

  80. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    4

  81. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm probably wrong. cause i honestly cannot think because im having a anaixty attack. I have been working working this for 5 hours, since 12:00 and im shaking

  82. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Good for the reactant side you got it. but To make things a little easier answer these questions: 1. How many for A on the reactants side 2. How many atoms for B on the reactant side 3. How many atoms for A on the product side 4. How many atoms for B on the product side

  83. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    you will get this because you got it already for the other problem

  84. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1. How many for A on the reactants side? 4 2. How many atoms for B on the reactant side2 3. How many atoms for A on the product side ? Idk 4. How many atoms for B on the product side ? Idk

  85. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Sorry im back now

  86. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    With my orginal questions it also ask What do you notice about the number of atoms? @Photon336

  87. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @PrincestonA you got it correct for the first part

  88. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Great job, now look at the product side, Ideally there should always be the same number of atoms of a, and the same number of atoms of B on the product side.

  89. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442616788888:dw| This is the products for the reaction I wrote. Can you tell me how many atoms of A and B there are? remember what I said about how to figure this out?

  90. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    i'm not leaving until you get it

  91. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok Sorry i was eating. But If it should be the same number then 1. How many for A on the reactants side? 4 2. How many atoms for B on the reactant side2 3. How many atoms for A on the product side ? 4 4. How many atoms for B on the product side ? 2

  92. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yes that's correct great job

  93. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    This will be true for any chemical equation when I say ANY i mean it

  94. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohhhhhhh I thought it was harder than that. i need to stop overthinking

  95. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    no it's not that hard trust me like for example |dw:1442618928467:dw|

  96. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ohhh i get it now

  97. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So how would i answer these final questions correctly?

  98. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Explain whether this is a chemical or physical change, and why. Does it involve elements, compounds, mixtures, or pure substances? Also describe how many atoms are involved before and after. What do you notice about the number of atoms?

  99. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    the same way we did it before

  100. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    STEP 1. Count number of atom(s) on the reactant side for each element in the compound STEP 2. Count number of atom(s) on the product side for each element in the compound. the number of atoms should be the same on both sides.

  101. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    FYI an element, are all on the periodic table of elements

  102. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    A compound has more than one element

  103. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Its a chemical Change because its change in the nature of the substance. N2 and H2 are elements and the NH3 is a compound. All of them are pure substances. And there are 8 atoms before the reation and 8 after the reaction.

  104. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Whew!!! I think i answered it

  105. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Yes. that's correct. Just sometimes don't over think it too much. just look for what is being asked and go from there.

  106. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what do they mean by this

  107. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What do you notice about the number of atoms?

  108. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    they are the same on both sides. you have 2 atoms of nitrogen and 6 atoms of hydrogen on both sides. you notice that on both sides you have 8 atoms on each side. @PrincestonA you answered your own question and you got it right.

  109. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    THANK YOU SO MUCH BRO!!!! I know I was slow asf at first but all I needed to do was eat something. I was studying and doing chem homework for 5 hours and starved myself and i started to shake and couldn't think right

  110. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  111. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    yeah no problem @PrincestonA great job, you got it now. like for every reaction you'll always have the same number of atoms on both sides for each element. always remember that, and make sure that you check too because sometimes the reaction isn't balanced.

  112. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok will do bro..:) And Thanks alot too @Cuanchi

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