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anonymous

  • one year ago

I really need help I don't have a math teacher so I'm trying learn this on my on so please someone help What is 16 5/4 in simplest form? There more questions but I'm putting the file down in the comments.

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. phi
    • one year ago
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    simplest form is a bit vague. But as a rule, if you see a fraction like \[ \frac{5}{4}\] where the top is bigger than the bottom, that is an "improper fraction" which means people would rather see it written as a mixed number can you write 5/4 as a mixed number?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i guess

  5. phi
    • one year ago
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    5/4 means divide 4 into 5, plus a remainder that you "put over" 4

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if you divide 4 into 5 it's 0.8

  7. phi
    • one year ago
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    that is 4/5 = 0.8 in other words you did 5 divided into 4

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    either I'm stupid or i just don't get what you're saying

  9. phi
    • one year ago
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    Can you post a copy of the question?

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes hold on

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What he's trying to say is you need to do the problem 5 divided by 4 as a starter

  13. phi
    • one year ago
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    oh, that is different from what I thought 5/4 is an exponent

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Oh same here :/

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    5 divided by 4 is 1.25

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ok so basically this problem is asking what is 16 to the power of 1.25 right @phi

  17. phi
    • one year ago
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    yes, 5/4 = 1.25 but that is not the problem we have to solve here the way we solve this is write the problem as \[ \left( 16^\frac{1}{4}\right)^5 \] the 1/4 power means the "fourth root"

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Right

  19. phi
    • one year ago
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    to find the 4th root (which is generally hard to do, but possible here) we should factor 16 into 2*2*2*2 = \(2^4\)

  20. phi
    • one year ago
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    do you see that 2 times itself 4 times is 16 ?

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    81?

  22. phi
    • one year ago
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    so we write 16 as 2^4 \[ \left( 16^\frac{1}{4}\right)^5 = \left( (2^4)^\frac{1}{4}\right)^5\]

  23. phi
    • one year ago
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    now use the rules of exponents we use this rule \[ (a^b)^c = a^{bc} \] on \[ (2^4)^\frac{1}{4} \] can you do that ?

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm stupid and lost

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    do 2x2x2x2

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    right?

  27. phi
    • one year ago
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    the rule \( (a^b)^c = a^{bc} \) means if you have an exponent b and another exponent c , we can multiply them

  28. phi
    • one year ago
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    you "match the pattern" \[ (a^b)^c = a^{bc} \\ (2^4)^\frac{1}{4} \]

  29. phi
    • one year ago
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    we could do 2*2*2*2 but we don't want to (because if we use the exponent rule we will get a simpler answer)

  30. phi
    • one year ago
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    look at these two things \[ (a^b)^c = a^{bc} \\ (2^4)^\frac{1}{4} \] do you see you can match a with 2, and 4 with b, and 1/4 with c ?

  31. phi
    • one year ago
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    the idea is we can rewrite (2^4)^(1/4) using that rule \[ 2^{4 \cdot \frac{1}{4} }\]

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i see numbers that's makes no sense to why the hell letters are in a math problem and we are talking about 16 and a 5/4 so where in the world did a 2 and a 1 come form

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm sorry that im getting mad and rude but i've been doing this all day and been have to learn this on my on

  34. phi
    • one year ago
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    the letters are how to show a "rule" we could use words, but it gets confusing. anyway, we started with \[ 16^\frac{5}{4} \] we use a "rule" to write that a different way \[ (16^\frac{1}{4})^5 \] before going on, do you know what 1/4 * 5 is ?

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1/4

  36. phi
    • one year ago
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    \[ \frac{1}{4} \cdot 5 = ?\] (as an improper fraction)

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sorry 1.25

  38. phi
    • one year ago
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    ok, but not as a decimal. what about as a fraction ?

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    no i dont i just know what it is as a decimal because my phone told me

  40. phi
    • one year ago
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    when you multiply fractions, you multiply top times top and bottom times bottom (if a number (like the 5) has no "bottom" , assume it is 1) now try again \[ \frac{1}{4} \cdot 5=?\]

  41. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    5/4

  42. phi
    • one year ago
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    yes. the reason we want to know that is we can say \[ \frac{5}{4}= \frac{1}{4} \cdot 5 \] and vice versa

  43. phi
    • one year ago
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    and there is a rule that let's us write \[ 16^\frac{5}{4} = (16^\frac{1}{4})^5 \]

  44. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so now i know where you got 1/4

  45. phi
    • one year ago
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    if you see \[ (16^\frac{1}{4})^5\] you should remember you are allowed to write it as \[ 16^\frac{5}{4} \] we need to be able to between these two different ways

  46. phi
    • one year ago
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    so far we have \[ (16^\frac{1}{4})^5\] the next thing is to know we can write 16 as 2*2*2*2 (this is the hard part, knowing that. but now you do. (don't forget) )

  47. phi
    • one year ago
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    do you know how to use the "short-cut" way using exponents to write 2*2*2*2 ? in other words that is 2^?

  48. phi
    • one year ago
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    2*2*2*2 is 2 to some power (some exponent) do you know what little number we should put in the upper right of 2 so that it means 2*2*2*2 ?

  49. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the answer 17 1/4

  50. phi
    • one year ago
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    do you know \(2^1 = 2 \) and \( 2^2 = 2\cdot 2\) and \(2^3 = 2\cdot 2\cdot 2\) ?

  51. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

  52. phi
    • one year ago
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    ok, so how do we write \[ 2\cdot 2\cdot 2\cdot 2= 2^? \]

  53. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    2 to the 4 power

  54. phi
    • one year ago
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    ok, so we know 16= 2*2*2*2 and that is 2^4

  55. phi
    • one year ago
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    \[ (16^\frac{1}{4})^5 \\ ((2^4)^\frac{1}{4})^5 \]

  56. phi
    • one year ago
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    now let's use the rule on \[ (2^4)^\frac{1}{4} \] remember we can multiply the exponents ?

  57. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    so I multiply 2^4 by 1/4?

  58. phi
    • one year ago
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    you multiply the exponents , so just 4*1/4 and that is the new exponent

  59. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    1

  60. phi
    • one year ago
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    that means \[ (2^4)^\frac{1}{4} = 2^1 \]

  61. phi
    • one year ago
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    so now we have this \[ (16^\frac{1}{4})^5 \\ ((2^4)^\frac{1}{4})^5 \\ (2^1)^5 \] notice we can use the rule again to multiply the exponents on the last line

  62. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    (2^1)5 is 10

  63. phi
    • one year ago
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    no, not 10 it is (2^1)^5 i.e. \( (2^1)^5\) multiply the exponents (that means 1 and 5)

  64. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    5

  65. phi
    • one year ago
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    yes, and that means 5 is the new exponent. so (2^1)^5 = 2^5 ok ?

  66. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay i get that

  67. phi
    • one year ago
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    they may want you to multiply that out for the final answer what is 2 times itself 5 times ?

  68. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    32

  69. phi
    • one year ago
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    yes, that is the answer

  70. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thank you so much for helping me and last question are you a math teacher?

  71. phi
    • one year ago
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    no

  72. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    you need to be

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