anonymous
  • anonymous
Suppose you discover a drug that prevents release of GABA from neurons of the ventrolateral preoptic nucleus (VLPO) in the hypothalamus. Would that be a drug that would probably put you to sleep or prevent you from sleeping?
Biology
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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anonymous
  • anonymous
@dan815 @Rushwr @Photon336 @natasha.galich
anonymous
  • anonymous
GABA (gamma aminobuytric acid) is an amino acid derivative that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter, preventing or reducing certain nerve signals. It controls nervous signals in the retina and the central nervous system, so insufficient GABA usually causes anxiety and even epileptic seizures. Drugs can temporarily increase GABA levels and in turn reduce anxiety, and offer anti-convulsive effects. (you can visit http://www.sleepdex.org/neuro.htm for more details but as it says insufficient GABA usually causes anxiety and i think it's hard to sleep in this situation.)
anonymous
  • anonymous
what kind of drug do you think it can be

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anonymous
  • anonymous
@amirreza1870 anyone else have any ideas
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes thank you so much
anonymous
  • anonymous
can i send over another question? @Rushwr
anonymous
  • anonymous
Some people need to use albuterol inhalers to overcome asthma attacks, but albuterol can also cause a side effect of rapid heart rate. Is the drug acting as an agonist or an antagonist when it binds to adrenergic receptors, and how does it have its primary effect in the lungs and secondary effect in on the heart?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yeah I'm taking a physiology class in college

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