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korosh23

  • one year ago

Can successful collision in collision theory be used for a solid metal and an (aq) substance? Ex. Fe(s) + 2HCl (aq) --> H2(g) + FeCl2 (aq)

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  1. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    If yes, by increasing the temperature, do I increase the successful collisions right?

  2. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336 if you have time. Help me. Thank you.

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @korosh23 yeah sure no problem.

  4. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    So that means I am correct?

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Well, yes you see like that's what happens in any chemical reaction you have successful collisions between particles

  6. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Exactly

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    what they mean by successful is that the particles collide with the sufficient orientation and energy

  8. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    let's see why though |dw:1442770275751:dw|

  9. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Right Ea, the minimum energy for successful collision to result.

  10. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    So on the reactant side we have, sometimes let's say we had a molecule of A and a molecule of B. see that hump at the transition state? well that's the activation energy, that's the minimum amount of energy we need to get the reaction to go to the products. if we keep raise the temperature it increases the chance that A and B will collide successfully to form products.

  11. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    certain reactions though if you keep increasing the temperature, instead of your reactants going to products, your products will go to reactants.

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    for example A + B Double arrow C + heat

  14. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    You mean this way --> <--

  15. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    this is an exothermic reaction, because heat is on the product side. like if we continued to raise the temperature here, the reaction will actually go the opposite way, the products will go back to the reactants to deal with that added heat.

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @korosh23 yeah that's what I meant I don't think there's a button for that .

  17. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Interesting

  18. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    but generally yeah for all chemical reactions you need successful collisions, the key word here was "successful" hope this was helpful

  19. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Very helpful, thank you for your time. :)

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