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Kitten_is_back

  • one year ago

Numbers p and q are negative integers. Which statements are always true? Choose all answers that are correct. A. p + q is a negative integer B. p • q is a positive integer C. p – q is a negative integer D. is a negative integer a b d

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  1. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    @H3LPN33DED

  2. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    p and q are negative numbers whenever we have two negative numbers multiplied by each other (product we get a positive number) \[-p \times -q = pq \]

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    integer means whole number like 1,2,3, ... {n} @Kitten_is_back

  4. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    okay so its b

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    \[-p+-q = -n \] whenever we have two negative numbers added to each other the result will always be a negative number. |dw:1442776117459:dw|

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Kitten_is_back there's more than one answer answer choice D they never told you whether d is negative or positive so how would you know? also for C why would you think that C may not be correct?

  7. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    i think c b d ;-;

  8. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    @Photon336

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Kitten_is_back see my explanation for A you can actually test this out yourself by plugging numbers in for p and q. say p is -2 and q is -1 if you add them -2+-1 you'll get -3. D, how would you know the answer for this if they didn't tell you whether d is positive or negative. for C you are told that they are negative numbers but you don't know whether is more negative than Q let's test this out say if p-q is negative right? let's say if p is -3 and q is - 2 and then let's switch them in the second example \[-3-(-2) = -1\] \[(-2)-(-3) = \] what pattern do you see?

  10. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    kind offfff

  11. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    YES

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    could you tell me what you see?

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Kitten_is_back

  14. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    mhm subtion works and divdsiomn

  15. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    You can test these claims @Kitten_is_back by plugging in any whole numbers, integers, and seeing if the claim works

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    It must work in every case, if it doesn't then the claim made is wrong

  17. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Question for you could you tell me whether this is true or not? by plugging in numbers for -a and -b \[-a*-b = ? \]

  18. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    true

  19. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    good, the best way to test these claims is to see whether or not you can make them false. clearly if I put in any negative integer for both this will always be positive hopefully this helped

  20. Kitten_is_back
    • one year ago
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    oho kay

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