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Astrophysics

  • one year ago

Stellar Aberration

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  1. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    A star in the sky is observed from earth to describe an elliptical path whose minor axis subtends an angle of 36". What angle does the star make with the ecliptic?

  2. Empty
    • one year ago
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    I have no idea how to measure angles in anything other than radians or degrees what are these 36''

  3. Empty
    • one year ago
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    also I don't even know what eccentricity of an ellipse is, so good luck

  4. Empty
    • one year ago
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    @Abhisar Help! xD

  5. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442805866424:dw| oh man this connection loss, can't evens et it up

  6. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    36" = 36 arc seconds it means 0.01 degrees

  7. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    blue is earth

  8. Empty
    • one year ago
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    hmmm it looks related to the dot product of your planet's velocity vector and the star's light velocity vector

  9. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yeah sort of, it has to do with relative velocity, but I guess I have to set it up differently, I have a few ideas

  10. Empty
    • one year ago
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    Alright so what's the elliptic?

  11. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Do you mean ecliptic :P

  12. Empty
    • one year ago
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    I don't know, sure why not, I just don't know what you're trying to do or what you're given.

  13. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    The best way to think of the ecliptic is the ecliptic plane, which is the orbit of earth, I'll try to explain it with a drawing |dw:1442806486190:dw|

  14. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Yeah don't worry about it actually, I'll figure it out haha

  15. Empty
    • one year ago
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    LIke in my mind, the "abberation" of the star will be at a minimum since you will have stopped approaching and star to move away from it. So it will appear to blue shift then red shift ever-so-slightly at the angle you are looking for.

  16. Empty
    • one year ago
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    But I don't actually know any physics so that's just me blowing hot air

  17. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Haha, that's actually right, but this question is a bit weird, it's not as complicated, but that was one idea I have, to set it up with the star at rest and in motion and find the angle

  18. Empty
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442806619945:dw| dot product = 0 but not sure if I am applying my idea of circles to ellipses in some way that doesn't exactly transfer over appropriately.

  19. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    Ok the best way to explain stellar aberration is, as we observe the position of stars, there is a change in light relative velocity

  20. Astrophysics
    • one year ago
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    I'll figure it out, thanks yo, but something cool, this is what was used to state that "ether" exists

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