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Abhisar

  • one year ago

Which of the following is strongest Lewis Base and How?

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  1. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    \(\sf O^{-2}, P^{-3}, N^{-3}, F^-\)

  2. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Woodward, Halp !!

  3. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442890874678:dw|

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Well, a Lewis base means it is an electron donor. I would imagine that the more electronegative an element is, the weaker of a Lewis base it will be, since it is ok with holding the electrons. However this is quite a weird case since we are comparing some elements that are multiply ionized. I don't think most of these are actually found except F- because they're all so basic. For instance, You have basically doubly deprotonated water, \(O^{2-}\) haha that's ridiculous. So I think the most basic one will be the one with the highest charge that's also the least electronegative. That's my best guess

  5. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    So it should be \(\sf P^{-3}\) ??

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah that's exactly what I'm saying :D

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Although it might be Nitrogen, I am not sure since the ionic radius of Phosphor is larger it might actually stabilize the electrons more.

  8. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    That's what i thought but the answer says \(\sf N^{-3}\) ;-;

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah that must be it then, haha. The charge density of nitrogen is just so much higher.

  10. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Yeah, cz it doesn't have a vacant d orbital. Right?

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    At that point, electronegativity is kind of... wimpy by comparison. I am only roughly guessing here so I'm sure there might be some other slightly better argument. I don't think Phosophor has d-orbitals, I don't think d-orbitals will show up until the next period of the periodic table.

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think that is wrong what I said about it, since I know I've thought about it having more than 4 bonds before, like in ylids for the Wittig reaction but... As far as inorganic sorta goes I couldn't tell you what is actually going on here.

  13. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    All right I get it. Inorganic is full of uncertainties. I have two more similar questions. One is related to oxy acids. Strongest acid among the following: \(\sf H_3PO_3, H_3AsO_4, H_3SbO_4, HNO_3\) I know its nitric acid but how would you explain that...

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I wouldn't say inorganic is full of uncertainties, I would say I have uncertainties though, I prefer more organic and physical chemistry so I'm a little bit weak in inorganic so I need more practice and study. For this trend, these are all essentially the same, so I think they're focusing on the idea that they are going down a column. But maybe not, since each of these have different numbers of oxygen on them, their oxidation states could be a thing? I'm not sure.

  15. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    I am damn confused about this stuff xD I read that oxidation states are used to compare similar oxyacids like if you wanna compare HClO4 and HClO2 . . . .

  16. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Ummm..can I say that since nitrogen is more non metalic so its oxy acid will be more acidic?

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't think that'll cut it, somehow though it's better at losing protons or gaining electrons. If I still had my inorganic book lying around I'd look it up in there and try to find out what kind of trends affect this but I am not sure.

  18. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Can you help me out with this later when you have your book. I need to figure out the trends affecting. I tried looking everywhere but was unable to find anything reliable to read.. :(

  19. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    so what is the question now? I think you already received assistance

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yeah I won't ever have my book back, I gave it to a friend haha.

  21. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Yes, but I need to figure what basically decides the trend. For instance take this next question... Strongest acid among the following ClO3OH , ClO2(OH), SO(OH)2, SO2(OH)2

  22. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    That's ok Woodward xD

  23. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    oh okay

  24. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    let's see what your answer is and how you would justify it.

  25. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    what I am doing is identifying what you know and see if there's anything I can do to fill some gaps.

  26. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Ok, So according to me chlorine is more non metallic than sulfur so its oxy acids will be more acidic. Now among ClO3OH and ClO2(OH), the former has higher oxidation state on the central atom hence it will be more acidic.

  27. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    what is the central atom in the \(\sf ClO_3OH \) and \(\sf ClO_2(OH) \)

  28. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    cHLORINE

  29. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    so it is the same central atom on both cases, how is it that one has a higher oxidation state?

  30. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Cz there are 4 oxygens and one H and 3 oxygen and one H on another......

  31. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    oh I think @Zale101 and I went over this kind of topic

  32. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    so let us define what is Lewis Acid

  33. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    The one which can accept electrons...

  34. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    electron pair acceptor

  35. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    Yes.

  36. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    let us see how the reaction would go in both cases

  37. Abhisar
    • one year ago
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    ok

  38. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    show me laughing out loud

  39. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    that is what I meant

  40. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    @zale101 show me what you got

  41. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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  42. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    sorry I was looking for something to share that summarizes the fun

  43. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    Is that the question?

  44. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    Li Be B C N O F Ne Na Mg Al Si P S Cl Ar

  45. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442894721722:dw|

  46. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    count the oxidation state for each

  47. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    I'm thinking of polarization. The more oxygen it has the more polarized it is. The more polarized the more acidic. Oxygen is electronegative and attracts electrons.

  48. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    what is the oxidation states of Cl in each case?

  49. Zale101
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442896304795:dw|

  50. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    correct. Although I am note sure if higher oxidation denotes higher polarization. There may be some correlation.

  51. nincompoop
    • one year ago
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    what do you think @empty ?

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