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anonymous

  • one year ago

LADY MACBETH. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty. Make thick my blood. Stop up the access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between The effect and it! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers,

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief. Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark To cry "Hold, hold!" William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene v What impression does Lady Macbeth's speech give you about her character? A. She is honorable and only wishes to do what's right. B. She is powerless against all the men in her life. C. She is afraid of her husband and what he will do to gain power. D. She is coldhearted, cruel, and very ambitious.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @mjparrish @Missiey @M3GA-BIT3 @FitzIncorporated @zarkam21 @dehelloo @wonderland_11 @nevermind_justschool @brandi03 @PrincestonA @darkdirl111296 @raymonde20

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    D

  4. raymonde20
    • one year ago
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    Well,

  5. raymonde20
    • one year ago
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    In Lady Macbeth's first soliloquy in Act 1, Scene 5, she is allowing her ambitious drive to get the better of her. She has just learned through Macbeth's letter to her that he was just made Dane of Cawdor and that the Three Witches had prophesied he would also be crowned king. Rather than being practical and considering dissuading him from doing anything rash for the mere sake of gaining power that is not rightfully his, she let's her own thirst for power ignite her own ambition, and she makes plans to encourage her husband to do whatever is needed to gain more power. This soliloquy is especially useful in portraying the dangers of excessive ambition, even portraying it as an illness.

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    confusing so which answer choice do you say ?

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