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calculusxy

  • one year ago

MEDAL!!! In parallelogram ABCD above, if sides AB and AD have lengths as shown, that is the length of the altitude to side AD? (Figure will be drawn below)

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  1. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442968342905:dw|

  2. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    @phi

  3. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    @peachpi @zepdrix

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    what do you mean by "that is the length of the altitude to side AD" in the first place?

  5. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    i don't know what that exactly means... or else i wouldn't have asked this question :\

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    dont you mean like how high above ground level is the parallelogram?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    or something like that?

  8. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    maybe ( or are you referencing the height)?

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    altitude is a reference to how high above or how low below ground/sea level

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    great, i just figured it out and i hate it

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    are you in trig rn?

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @calculusxy i think i figured it out if you werent paying attention

  13. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    no i don't know trig very well, but i can work with sine, cosine, tangent (only the basics)

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thats what this is

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    line BC is going to be ground level for this

  16. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    i don't quite understand what you mean

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    if i remember right your going to use cosine to find the distance from line BC to line AD, giving you your answer (its either cosine or sine, i dont remember them that well)

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1442980427600:dw|

  19. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    @surjithayer Can you plz explain this to me more?

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thx show off

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    basically multiply the sine of 60 degrees by 12 to get your answer

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    h is altitude |dw:1442980656562:dw|

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[\sin 60=\frac{ \sqrt{3} }{ 2 }\]

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i just said everything he put up there in a nice sentence without any complication

  25. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    and how do i evaluate that @surjithayer

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    \[h=12 \sin 60=12*\frac{ \sqrt{3} }{ 2 }=6\sqrt{3}\]

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i like how i always start it then someone else comes in and takes all the fricken credit that i actually did before they did -_-

  28. calculusxy
    • one year ago
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    oh okay ! but is there any simper way of doing it?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    and the perfect example is the one above

  30. Jhannybean
    • one year ago
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    That's about the easiest way to do it with the given information.

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thx for saying i had no idea what im doing and that a person that does the exact same thing makes complete sense, can someone explain that one to me >:(

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    i seriously think that letting someone finish there answer and explanation should be on the CoC

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