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anonymous

  • one year ago

I Need 5 differences and 5 similarities between Greece and Rome WILL FAN AND MEDAL

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @NANI25 @AmyRoseRules @Helpppmeee1999 @geekfromthefutur @babylove2015 ???

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    wat

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    can you help?

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Could u find anything else on the inter web about it

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    similarites: enconomy,military,punishment,mythology,citizenship. differences; perception of art, goverment, socail classes, and wealth hope i helped :)

  6. IronHide
    • one year ago
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    Modern Greece/Rome, or ancient Greece/Rome?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @ironhide acient

  8. IronHide
    • one year ago
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    First of all, Rome's art style was actually inspired by Greece, and a lot of historians consider Roman art the Roman copy of a Greek piece, but not all Roman art is an imitation from Greece. In general, Grecian art are those realistic statues you think of, and Roman art was focused more on mosaics like wall paintings, but both were central toward pottery. Greek art was so versatile whereas Roman art focused on a few select styles of art, which is why it seems so imitative of Greek art. So they are very very similar in some aspects, but they're not exactly alike. Romans were merely inspired by Grecians, and they focused more on mosaics and pottery, while Grecians focused on statues and pottery. Their economy differed in the fact that the Greeks harvested their food and thought of importation/trade degrading, whereas the Romans imported their grains and traded food. They were both based on agriculture, but Romans relied solely on slave labor, while Grecians had farming occupations + slave labor. They both used coinage but Romans were extremely exclusive, their was a very thick line between societal structures, whereas in Greece it was a little more vast. They were very elitist as well, but you couldn't compare them to the Romans. A perfect example is, as I said, Romans relied completely on slave labor. The social classes of Greece were: slaves, freedmen, women, metics and 'citizens'. In Rome: slaves, freedmen, plebeians, patricians. In Greece, women were not considered citizens, and in Rome they were. Their societies were divided by wealth. In Greece, the aristocratic woman was secluded in the women's quarter and had to be accompanied in public places. She could own, but not sell property, she was subject to her father, and even after marriage, he could ask for her return. And again, they were not citizens. They were relied on solely to clean homes and produce children. The Roman woman was legally subject to the 'man of the family' called the paterfamilias AKA the head of the household, whether the dominant male in her household was of birth or the household of her husband. She could own and dispose of property and go about as she wished. From epigraphy, we read that a Roman woman was valued for piety, modesty, maintenance of harmony, and being a one-man woman. The Roman woman could be a Roman citizen. In both societies, the father of the family was dominant and could decide whether or not to keep a newborn child. In Rome, adult sons with families of their own were still subject to their own father if his father was the paterfamilias. In the Greek family, or oikos, household, sons could legally challenge the competence of their fathers. Both societies changed form of government multiple times. Greece: monarchy (ruled by kings only), then an oligarchy (rule by the few), and then democracy (voting by the citizens). Rome: monarchy (also kings only), republican government (combining oligarchy and democracy), then they went to being ruled by Emperors. Greece's government was weak, but Rome's government caused problems, eventually dividing the countries so that sanctions were ruled by small kingdoms. They both began as city-states and they both developed into large civilizations. Both strongly influenced modern government. Rome's political structure provided for representation by two political parties in the Senate. The patricians represented the aristocracy, or nobles, while the plebeians represented the middle-class and wealthy merchants. The Greek government did not have political parties. However, the Greeks realized that allowing public officials to be elected by popular vote would nearly always result in the wealthiest, most educated and most well-known citizens being elected. In order to make the government representative, Greek officials allowed election to some public offices -- those not requiring particular qualifications, such as military experience -- to be decided by a lottery system to which any citizen could submit their name. (paragraph via classroom.com) Similarities: art, family, the wealthy, evolution, religion, politics, influence on modernities, military, etc Differences: economy, treatment/value of women, government, class system, party system and political accountability, etc Just do a little research.

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