A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

bleuspectre

  • one year ago

Simplify (3x^3y^4)^2/(6x^5y^3)(x^3y^2)^4 1/x^7y^3 3/2x^11y^3 3x^11y^3/2 9x^6/y^3

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    familiar with the exponent rules ?

  2. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Not much :/

  3. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    alright exponent rules \[\huge\rm (ab)^m =a^mb^m\] numbers/variables in the parentheses raised by m power when we multiply same bases we should `add` exponents \[\huge\rm x^m \times x^n=x^{m+n}\] and when we divide same base , `subtract` their exponents \[\huge\rm \frac{ x^m }{ x^n }=x^{m-n}\]

  4. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\huge\rm \frac{ \color{ReD}{(3x^3y^4)^2}}{(6x^5y^3)(x^3y^2)^4}\] start with first exponent rule i posted above

  5. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\huge\rm {(3x^3y^4)^2} = ??\]

  6. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Would it be (3x^5y^6)?

  7. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I'm not good at math :/

  8. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    multiply the exponents

  9. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    you will be one day

  10. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    exponent rules \[\huge\rm (a^1b^1)^m =a^{1 \times m}b^{1 \times m}\] numbers/variables in the parentheses raised by m power according to this rule \[\huge\rm {(3x^3y^4)^2} = 3^3 x^{3 \times2}y^{4 \times3}\] every number/variable in the parentheses raised by 2 power multiply the exponents

  11. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3^3x^6y^12

  12. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    sorry there is a typo \[\huge\rm {(3x^3y^4)^2} = 3^2 x^{3 \times2}y^{4 \times3}\] 3 to the 2 power not 3

  13. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok

  14. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    the power tells us how many times we should multiply the base 3^2 = 3 times 3

  15. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Ok

  16. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    ugh typo sorry there is a typo \[\huge\rm {(3x^3y^4)^2} = 3^2 x^{3 \times2}y^{4 \times2}\] 3 to the 2 power not 3 and y^4 times 2 not 3 now simplify that

  17. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[(3x ^{3}y ^{4})^{2} = 3^{2}x ^{6}y ^{8}\]

  18. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes right what about 3^2 = ?

  19. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    9

  20. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes right so \[\huge\rm \frac{ \color{ReD}{9x^6y^8}}{(6x^5y^3)(x^3y^2)^4}\] now apply the same exponent rule for (x^3y^2)^4

  21. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Would i combine them?

  22. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    apply the exponent rule just like we did for the numerator

  23. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Because I got \[x ^{12}y ^{8}\]

  24. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    would I multiply the 4 to the other one too?

  25. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    no bec 4 is power of x^3 y^2 so that's it for this part \[\huge\rm \frac{ \color{black}{9x^6y^8}}{(6x^5y^3)x^{12}y^{8}}\] you can remove the parentheses from (6x^5y^3) bec there isn't any exponent outside the parentheses \[\huge\rm \frac{ \color{black}{9x^6y^8}}{6x^5y^3x^{12}y^{8}}\] now apply the 2nd exponent rule ~when we multiply same bases we should `add` exponents \[\huge\rm x^m \times x^n=x^{m+n}\]

  26. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[6x ^{17}y ^{11}\]

  27. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    nice \[\huge\rm \frac{ \color{black}{9x^6y^8}}{6x^{17}y^{11}}\] reduce the fraction 9/6 and apply the exponent rule when we divide same base , `subtract` their exponents \[\huge\rm \frac{ x^m }{ x^n }=x^{m-n}\]

  28. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    3x^11y^3/2

  29. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    hmm top exponent `minus` bottom exxponents so `6-17` = ?

  30. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    oh -11 and -3

  31. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes right now we need to change negative to positive exponent \[\huge\rm x^{-m}=\frac{ 1 }{ x^m }\] to convert negative to positive exponent u should flip the fraction , when you flip it the sign of the exponent would change

  32. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    So 3/2x^11y^3

  33. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    looks good

  34. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Thank you so much!

  35. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    np good work you just need to practice more on this stuff then you will be an expert at exponent rules

  36. bleuspectre
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I will keep practicing, thank you again.

  37. Nnesha
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    o^_^o

  38. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.