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HelloKitty17

  • one year ago

If you want to improve your muscular strength, what is the best plan? Low resistance with high reps High resistance with low reps Low resistance with low reps High resistance with high reps

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  1. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @Learner11

  2. Blind_Love149
    • one year ago
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    Low resistance with high reps

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @imqwerty

  4. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @Lonnie2018 @Loser66

  5. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @open.owl @OregonDuck @texaschic101

  6. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @TorilovesVampires

  7. TorilovesVampires
    • one year ago
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    Share If you walk into most gyms today, you’ll see a major contrast between the weights used by men and women. Some women will curl 5lb dumbbells for 25 reps in an effort to “tone” their arms, while some guys will bench a ton of weight for only a few reps in an effort to put on muscle and increase strength. The idea is that high reps help you lose fat and make a muscle more “toned”. On the other hand, low reps can help you build muscle and increase strength. Is it really this simple? High reps for fat loss and low reps for strength and muscle building? In this article, you will learn why it’s a smart idea to use both low and high rep ranges in your workout regimen if you want to build muscle, lose fat, or simply improve overall physical fitness. You will also learn why you can build muscle, increase strength, or lose fat with just about any rep range, but some rep ranges are more optimal than others for each training outcome. Finally, in terms of time-efficiency, safety, and overall effectiveness, the ideal rep ranges to elicit the greatest changes in body composition (both fat loss and muscle building) likely occur within the 8-15 rep range. High Reps Vs. Low Reps | The Strength Continuum The Strength Continuum is a framework where strength and endurance exist on a continuum that defines the relationship between weight, reps, and training outcome. Strength is represented by the 1 repetition maximum (1RM), which is the maximum weight that can be lifted for one rep, and endurance is the ability to exert a lower force repeatedly over time. Low repetitions with high weight increases strength, whereas high repetitions with low weight increases endurance. According to the concept, as repetitions increase there is a gradual transition from strength to endurance. Below is a commonly used graph of the strength continuum. The training outcome “Hypertrophy”, which means muscle-building is not an entirely accurate label as you’ll learn more about in a moment. This framework also works in line with our understanding of muscle fiber types. High reps develop Type 1 muscle fibers (“slow twitch”) that are endurance based and slow to fatigue. Lower repetitions activate Type 2 muscle fibers (“fast twitch”), which have greater power but fatigue quickly. High Reps vs. Low Reps | Strength For optimal strength increases, the research conclusively supports low reps with high weight vs. high reps with low weight, but high reps can still elicit gains in strength as well.1 For example, in one study, 23 cyclists were placed into high resistance/low repetition (LR), low resistance/high repetition (HR), or cycling-only groups for a 10-week program.2 There were substantial strength gains in all 4 resistance training exercises tested for both LR and HR groups, but the LR group had “significantly” greater strength gains than the HR group in the leg press exercise. Interestingly, muscle hypertrophy and overall endurance was relatively equal. As this study and many others highlight, for optimal strength gains, lift relatively heavier weight for low reps. This is in line with how Powerlifters train for competitions to help increase neuromuscular adaptation, which is the efficiency of the brain to control the muscles. You can get stronger as a result of increase in muscle size OR increase in neuromuscular adaptation.

  8. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    @Keygrover

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    high resistance with low reps

  10. HelloKitty17
    • one year ago
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    does everyone agree with @Leenz

  11. TorilovesVampires
    • one year ago
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    Yes

  12. Blind_Love149
    • one year ago
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    no

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