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anonymous

  • one year ago

Electro Petro. You recently acquired a vintage Aston Martin automobile and you ponder the possibility of placing static charge on gasoline when filling at the pump. (a). Explain if and how this is possible (b). Given a tiny drop of gasoline has a mass of 8.0 x 10^(-15)kg and a positive charge of 4.8x10^-19 C, determine the weight of the gasoline drop. (c). If the gasoline drop is subjected to an upward electric field of magnitude 6.0x10^5 N/C, determine the magnitude of the electrostatic force exerted on the gasoline drop (d). Determine the magnitude of the acceleration of the gasoline

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I'm not exactly sure about (a). But isn't (b) simply mg? Or do I have to factor in the positive charge somehow? Including that piece information specifically at (b). didn't make sense to me. (c). I know that electric force due to a field on a particle is F=kQq/r^2. But in this scenario I'm a bit confused because I'm not given a certain distance and I only have one charge. (d). Could I solve this part simply by using F=ma once I calculate the F from part (c)?

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    b) Would be mg which is mass in kg times gravitational force. For c and d. We would use the formula \[F _{e}=qE=ma\] For a you would need to research it.

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Fe is electric force, q is charge. E is electric field. m is mass in kg and a is acceleration

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Ahh! I see my stupid mistake. They already gave us E, so basically Q and r are already accounted for. Thus F=qE. Much thanks! :)

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yep. Nice job figuring it out. Good luck on the rest.

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