DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
I need help understanding constants
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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schrodinger
  • schrodinger
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
|dw:1443061144471:dw|
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
and i need to experiment using numbers for a b and c when the other two are constants
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
@Data_LG2

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anonymous
  • anonymous
but what are you trying to do though? finding the relationship of those variables?.. can you take a screen shot of the whole question ?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Is t representing a variable, time perhaps? And the others are constants?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So what type of translations are you trying to make? :) reflections? shifts? change in amplitude/asymptote?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
To translate left or right, you would replace \(\large\rm t\) with something. Or just make an adjustment to t, however you want to look at it. If I want to shift the entire function 2 units to the right, I would replace t with t-2.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Example:\[\Huge\rm 3e^{-2e^{-2\color{orangered}{t}}}\qquad\to\qquad 3e^{-2e^{-2\color{orangered}{(t-2)}}}\]
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
They be wanting me to find what values b tranlate function right
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Oh ya I guess b translates it :) Didn't notice lol that's neat
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
loool
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
So would be just plug in b for something?
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
thats greater than 0 I mean
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Ya, here are some examples: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/jtq3mi46x6
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
I dunno what kind of numbers you're looking for :3 maybe those are too big
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
so for this example -2 is the is the constant for c?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
a=1, c=2 according to your formula.
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
explain please?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
\[\Huge\rm ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{c}t}}\qquad\to\qquad ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{2}t}}\]The negative is part of your formula, it's not part of the c.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
If we plugged in c=-2, we would get this instead,\[\Huge\rm ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{c}t}}\qquad\to\qquad ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{(-2)}t}}\]
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
so question then is that recorded inthe graph in desmos? Thats like saying positive 2 t?
DarkBlueChocobo
  • DarkBlueChocobo
Sorry I asking so many questions trying to figure out more than just solve kinda deal
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
So this is what I graphed: Green a=1, b=2, c=2 Purple a=1, b=4, c=2 Black a=1, b=12, c=2
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
I think that's what you mentioned earlier, yes? That b and c must be greater than zero. So I was plugging in positive numbers, hence they are all negative because of the formula getting it to them.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Think of it like one big snake. They picked up the snake and moved him 2 to the right, and set him down. They didn't stretch or distort in any way. They simply every point of the function 2 units to the right.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
They simply moved* every point of the function 2 units to the right.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
But yes, you can use the origin as a point of reference. The green line, b=2, has a nice point (0, 0.135) This point on the purple line, b=4, has moved to (0.346, 0.135) So I should be careful the way I say that :( It's not a straight up `linear transformation`. It isn't actually moving it 2 units like I was saying before.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Very weird function +_+
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
XD
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Well it's unclear `how much` b is affecting the function. But we can, at the very least, say that that: the larger b gets, the further the function moves to the right, ya?
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
I'm not sure what else we can say about it XD lol
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
Yes. a usually stands for "amplitude", it makes the function "grow" faster. But yes, it looks like it's affecting our horizontal asymptote here. a=2 would allow the function to grow to double it's ending size.
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
No. lol you just sent me my own graph back 0_o
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
You can't copy/paste the link at the top of the site. You have to log-in, and then use the `share graph` button :) it's a green button that shows up after you log in
zepdrix
  • zepdrix
The b and c values didn't change as you adjusted your a values. Good! :)

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