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DarkBlueChocobo

  • one year ago

I need help understanding constants

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  1. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443061144471:dw|

  2. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    and i need to experiment using numbers for a b and c when the other two are constants

  3. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    @Data_LG2

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    but what are you trying to do though? finding the relationship of those variables?.. can you take a screen shot of the whole question ?

  5. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Is t representing a variable, time perhaps? And the others are constants?

  6. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    So what type of translations are you trying to make? :) reflections? shifts? change in amplitude/asymptote?

  7. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    To translate left or right, you would replace \(\large\rm t\) with something. Or just make an adjustment to t, however you want to look at it. If I want to shift the entire function 2 units to the right, I would replace t with t-2.

  8. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Example:\[\Huge\rm 3e^{-2e^{-2\color{orangered}{t}}}\qquad\to\qquad 3e^{-2e^{-2\color{orangered}{(t-2)}}}\]

  9. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    They be wanting me to find what values b tranlate function right

  10. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Oh ya I guess b translates it :) Didn't notice lol that's neat

  11. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    loool

  12. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    So would be just plug in b for something?

  13. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    thats greater than 0 I mean

  14. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Ya, here are some examples: https://www.desmos.com/calculator/jtq3mi46x6

  15. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    I dunno what kind of numbers you're looking for :3 maybe those are too big

  16. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    so for this example -2 is the is the constant for c?

  17. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    a=1, c=2 according to your formula.

  18. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    explain please?

  19. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    \[\Huge\rm ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{c}t}}\qquad\to\qquad ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{2}t}}\]The negative is part of your formula, it's not part of the c.

  20. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    If we plugged in c=-2, we would get this instead,\[\Huge\rm ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{c}t}}\qquad\to\qquad ae^{-be^{-\color{orangered}{(-2)}t}}\]

  21. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    so question then is that recorded inthe graph in desmos? Thats like saying positive 2 t?

  22. DarkBlueChocobo
    • one year ago
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    Sorry I asking so many questions trying to figure out more than just solve kinda deal

  23. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    So this is what I graphed: Green a=1, b=2, c=2 Purple a=1, b=4, c=2 Black a=1, b=12, c=2

  24. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    I think that's what you mentioned earlier, yes? That b and c must be greater than zero. So I was plugging in positive numbers, hence they are all negative because of the formula getting it to them.

  25. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Think of it like one big snake. They picked up the snake and moved him 2 to the right, and set him down. They didn't stretch or distort in any way. They simply every point of the function 2 units to the right.

  26. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    They simply moved* every point of the function 2 units to the right.

  27. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    But yes, you can use the origin as a point of reference. The green line, b=2, has a nice point (0, 0.135) This point on the purple line, b=4, has moved to (0.346, 0.135) So I should be careful the way I say that :( It's not a straight up `linear transformation`. It isn't actually moving it 2 units like I was saying before.

  28. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Very weird function +_+

  29. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    XD

  30. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Well it's unclear `how much` b is affecting the function. But we can, at the very least, say that that: the larger b gets, the further the function moves to the right, ya?

  31. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    I'm not sure what else we can say about it XD lol

  32. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    Yes. a usually stands for "amplitude", it makes the function "grow" faster. But yes, it looks like it's affecting our horizontal asymptote here. a=2 would allow the function to grow to double it's ending size.

  33. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    No. lol you just sent me my own graph back 0_o

  34. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    You can't copy/paste the link at the top of the site. You have to log-in, and then use the `share graph` button :) it's a green button that shows up after you log in

  35. zepdrix
    • one year ago
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    The b and c values didn't change as you adjusted your a values. Good! :)

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