anonymous
  • anonymous
How does Lady Macbeth influence Macbeth's decision to murder Duncan? A. She laughs at Macbeth's belief in the witches' prophecy, making him angry enough to kill the king. B. She warns Macbeth that if he does not kill the king, his children will go hungry and likely die. C. She tells Macbeth how proud she is of him, calling him strong and manly, until he agrees to kill the king. D. She calls Macbeth weak and questions his strength of character, pushing him to agree to the crime.
English
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
Hey! We 've verified this expert answer for you, click below to unlock the details :)
SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
I got my questions answered at brainly.com in under 10 minutes. Go to brainly.com now for free help!
anonymous
  • anonymous
LADY MACBETH. Was the hope drunk Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since? And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i' the adage? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene vii
anonymous
  • anonymous
Macbeth was influenced in a variety of ways to engage in 'bloody business' and ultimately 'bear the knife' against Duncan. Firstly, the three 'weird sisters' (the witches) tell Macbeth that he will become king- 'all hail Macbeth, that shalt be King hereafter'. They put this idea in his head, which sparks his 'vaulting ambition'. Then his 'dear wife' (Lady Macbeth) hears about their 'supernatural soliciting' and tells him that in order to be king, he must kill Duncan. Macbeth is initially hesitant about murdering Duncan who he deems to be a great king. But then Duncan names his son, Malcolm, heir to the throne and reignites Macbeth's 'deep and dark desires' to become the reigning Monarch. Still slightly uncertain, Lady Macbeth threatens his manhood, 'When you durst do it, then you were a man' and Macbeth creeps towards Duncan's chambers, intending to commit the 'horrid deed'. He is further encouraged when a supernatural motif, a 'dagger of the mind' appears before him. On it are 'gouts of blood' and this inspires Macbeth to open the door and instigate Duncan's 'surcease'. A combination of supernatural forces, a manipulative wife, three scheming witches and Duncan's decision to announce his son future king are all influencing factors in Macbeth's ultimate decision to murder King Duncan.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Dang its hard to read all around that old time garble...

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.

More answers

anonymous
  • anonymous
ikr
anonymous
  • anonymous
D Because I looked at it.... looked at it some more.... then when I found out we were in the same grade I just looked up the question.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Medal me bruh.
anonymous
  • anonymous
It's D, (D-EE) Deh
anonymous
  • anonymous
MACBETH. We will proceed no further in this business: He hath honour'd me of late; and I have bought Golden opinions from all sorts of people, Which would be worn now in their newest gloss, Not cast aside so soon. LADY MACBETH. Was the hope drunk Wherein you dress'd yourself? hath it slept since? And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting "I dare not" wait upon "I would," Like the poor cat i' the adage? MACBETH. Prithee, peace: I dare do all that may become a man; Who dares do more is none. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene vii What evidence from the text supports your answer to the previous question? A. "I have bought / Golden opinions from all sorts of people, / Which would be worn now in their newest gloss, / Not cast aside so soon." B. "Prithee, peace: / I dare do all that may become a man; / Who dares do more is none." C. "Art thou afeard / To be the same in thine own act and valour / As thou art in desire?" D. "We will proceed no further in this business: / He hath honour'd me of late"
anonymous
  • anonymous
@kiamousekia
anonymous
  • anonymous
C. because she is calling him a coward trying to guilt him into killing duncan.
anonymous
  • anonymous
LADY MACBETH. The raven himself is hoarse That croaks the fatal entrance of Duncan Under my battlements. Come, you spirits That tend on mortal thoughts, unsex me here, And fill me from the crown to the toe top-full Of direst cruelty. Make thick my blood. Stop up the access and passage to remorse, That no compunctious visitings of nature Shake my fell purpose, nor keep peace between The effect and it! Come to my woman's breasts, And take my milk for gall, you murd'ring ministers, Wherever in your sightless substances You wait on nature's mischief. Come, thick night, And pall thee in the dunnest smoke of hell, That my keen knife see not the wound it makes, Nor heaven peep through the blanket of the dark To cry "Hold, hold!" William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene v What impression does Lady Macbeth's speech give you about her character? A. She is powerless against all the men in her life. B. She is coldhearted, cruel, and very ambitious. C. She is afraid of her husband and what he will do to gain power. D. She is honorable and only wishes to do what's right.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@darkdirl111296
anonymous
  • anonymous
i say B. it definitely isn't A because she apparently has some kind of power over Macbeth. Nit C because she sure was not afraid of Macbeth. & not D because she definitely is not an honorable person
anonymous
  • anonymous
LADY MACBETH. Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win. Thou'ld'st have, great Glamis, That which cries, "Thus thou must do," if thou have it, And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene v How does Lady Macbeth feel about her husband in this passage? A. She believes he is too superstitious and will want to hear more of the witches' prophecies. B. She believes he is weak and won't do what needs to be done to become king. C. She believes he is lucky to have been granted a new title and should remain faithful to the king. D. She believes that he won't be loyal to the king and will be branded a traitor and executed.
anonymous
  • anonymous
She definitely believes he is weak because she tells him so in the play several times
anonymous
  • anonymous
Lady Macbeth became more ambitious as she read her husband's letter about the predictions of the three witches. She expressed that ambition in an increasingly violent, selfish and aggressive way. Ultimately, she called upon the forces of evil for help in claiming the throne for her husband and herself. She made it clear that she brooked no opposition, no second opinions, no weakness from her husband in their bloody mission. Likewise did she make it clear that she wouldn't stop short of total victory for her and her husband, or of total destruction for her sovereign and guest, King Duncan I.
anonymous
  • anonymous
How does Lady Macbeth feel about her husband in this passage? A. She believes he is too superstitious and will want to hear more of the witches' prophecies. B. She believes he is weak and won't do what needs to be done to become king. C. She believes he is lucky to have been granted a new title and should remain faithful to the king. D. She believes that he won't be loyal to the king and will be branded a traitor and executed. which one do we go with ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
-_- which 1 says that her husband is weak
anonymous
  • anonymous
B
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes look i cant just hand u the answers. u have to think a little bit but i will give u hints reasons & personal opinions but i know they wont always be correct
anonymous
  • anonymous
Read the following passage: LADY MACBETH. Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be What thou art promised. Yet do I fear thy nature; It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness To catch the nearest way: thou wouldst be great, Art not without ambition, but without The illness should attend it. What thou wouldst highly, That wouldst thou holily; wouldst not play false, And yet wouldst wrongly win. Thou'ld'st have, great Glamis, That which cries, "Thus thou must do," if thou have it, And that which rather thou dost fear to do, Than wishest should be undone. Hie thee hither, That I may pour my spirits in thine ear And chastise with the valor of my tongue All that impedes thee from the golden round, Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem To have thee crowned withal. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene v What evidence from the text supports your answer to the previous question? A. "Glamis thou art, and Cawdor; and shalt be / What thou art promised." B. "Hie thee hither. / That I may pour my spirits in thine ear" C. "Which fate and metaphysical aid doth seem / To have thee crowned withal." D. "Yet do I fear thy nature; / It is too full o' th' milk of human kindness / To catch the nearest way"
anonymous
  • anonymous
which one do u believe is from his wife & is putting down Macbeth?
anonymous
  • anonymous
this a confusing one i think its c or a
anonymous
  • anonymous
A was spoken by the witches C aid means help so no its the one that says Macbeth has FEAR & is too KIND... 2 hints lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
D ?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
MACBETH. He's here in double trust: First, as I am his kinsman and his subject, Strong both against the deed; then, as his host, Who should against his murderer shut the door, Not bear the knife myself. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene vii Which translation of the passage best explains Macbeth's reasoning for not murdering Duncan? A. Duncan is a guest in my house and I should be protecting him, not harming him myself. B. People are happy to have Duncan remain as their king and will be upset if he is murdered. C. Duncan will be too easy to kill because he is so trusting and believes everything people tell him. D. People will automatically suspect that I am the murderer because they know I want to be king.
anonymous
  • anonymous
D. Duncan is a guest in my house and I should be protecting him, not harming him myself. Macbeth is saying that "I am his kinsman and his subject" so I am loyal to him, I don't want him to be killed. As well, because he is my guest, as his host, I should not harm him.
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes but thats A not D lol
anonymous
  • anonymous
What can you infer about Macbeth's character from his hesitation to murder the king? A. Macbeth has both good and bad qualities, but ambition and his wife's arguments are influencing him. B. Macbeth has no good qualities and has long been looking for an excuse to kill the king. C. Macbeth is weak and lacks strength of character because he refuses to come to a quick decision. D. Macbeth is careful and wants to be sure that his role in the crime is never uncovered.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Well the Main down fall of Duncan is that he is too AMBITIOUS
anonymous
  • anonymous
Macbeth has both good and bad qualities, but ambition and his wife's arguments are influencing him?
anonymous
  • anonymous
yes
anonymous
  • anonymous
Read the following passage: MACBETH. Bring forth men-children only; For thy undaunted mettle should compose Nothing but males. Will it not be received, When we have mark'd with blood those sleepy two Of his own chamber and used their very daggers, That they have done't? LADY MACBETH. Who dares receive it other, As we shall make our griefs and clamour roar Upon his death? MACBETH. I am settled, and bend up Each corporal agent to this terrible feat. Away, and mock the time with fairest show: False face must hide what the false heart doth know. William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene vii Which lines lead you to the conclusion that Macbeth has decided to kill the king? A. "Who dares receive it other, / As we shall make our griefs and clamour roar / Upon his death?" B. "Bring forth men-children only; / For thy undaunted mettle should compose / Nothing but males." C. "I am settled, and bend up / Each corporal agent to this terrible feat." D. "When we have mark'd with blood those sleepy two / Of his own chamber and used their very daggers"
anonymous
  • anonymous
The tragedy of Macbeth was written by William Shakespeare, probably between 1603 and 1606. The play has been adapted into operas, movies, television programs, and other books.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i believe it was D but im not completely sure on that one i loved & just read Macbeth not too long ago so i do know a lot about it.
anonymous
  • anonymous
SERGEANT. Doubtful it stood; As two spent swimmers, that do cling together And choke their art. The merciless Macdonwald Worthy to be a rebel, for to that The multiplying villanies of nature Do swarm upon him from the western isles Of kerns and gallowglasses is supplied; And fortune, on his damned quarrel smiling, Show'd like a rebel's whore: but all's too weak: For brave Macbeth well he deserves that name Disdaining fortune, with his brandish'd steel, Which smoked with bloody execution, Like valour's minion carved out his passage Till he faced the slave; Which ne'er shook hands, nor bade farewell to him, Till he unseam'd him from the nave to the chaps, And fix'd his head upon our battlements. DUNCAN. O valiant cousin! worthy gentleman! William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act I, scene ii What impression do you gain of Macbeth from the views expressed in this passage? A. Macbeth is a heroic soldier and an honorable man. B. Macbeth is a cruel, villainous man and is not to be trusted. C. Macbeth is emotionally and physically weak. D. Macbeth is a merciless killer, and everyone is slightly afraid of him.
anonymous
  • anonymous
i was thinking a
anonymous
  • anonymous
i believe it is but we could be wrong i dont remember that passage in the play to be honest...
anonymous
  • anonymous
MACBETH. Is this a dagger which I see before me, The handle toward my hand? Come, let me clutch thee. I have thee not, and yet I see thee still. Art thou not, fatal vision, sensible To feeling as to sight? or art thou but A dagger of the mind, a false creation, Proceeding from the heat-oppressed brain? William Shakespeare, Macbeth, Act II, scene i What evidence from the text leads you to believe that the dagger Macbeth sees is an illusion? A. "Is this a dagger which I see before me, / The handle toward my hand?" B. "I see thee yet, in form as palpable / As this which now I draw." C. "Or art thou but / A dagger of the mind" D. "Thou marshall'st me the way that I was going; / And such an instrument I was to use."
anonymous
  • anonymous
He's hallucinating. He's going mad with guilt.
anonymous
  • anonymous
C. a dagger of the mind means only he can see the dagger & is most likely hallucinating
anonymous
  • anonymous
The passage of made witch trials legal in England and resulted in the deaths of 270 people. A. the Witchcraft Act B. the Shakespeare Act C. the Witch Hunter Act D. the King James Act
anonymous
  • anonymous
hmm i believe D. because King James was facinated by witch craft but im only guessing
anonymous
  • anonymous
During Shakespeare's time, who was often blamed for tragedies and misfortunes that seemed to have no explanation? A. Women B. Witches C. Criminals D. Kings

Looking for something else?

Not the answer you are looking for? Search for more explanations.