A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

Kailee1423

  • one year ago

Use the Distance Formula and the x-axis of the coordinate plane. Show why the distance between two points on a number line (the x-axis) is | a – b |, where a and b are the x-coordinates of the points.

  • This Question is Closed
  1. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @phi

  2. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @mathlover2014 @Jhannybean

  3. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    @HelloKitty17 @They_Call_Me_Narii @FEARLESS_JOCEY

  4. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Do you know the "distance formula" ? Is it in your notes?

  5. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    d=the square root of x2-x1^2 + y2-y1^2

  6. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Are you there? Lol

  7. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    OS is back. yes that is the correct formula. they want you to use it for two points that lie on the x-axis (that means they y value is 0)

  8. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    for example, the two points can be (a,0) and (b,0) (if we plot them (if we knew what number a and b were) , they would be on the x-axis any way, use the distance formula to find the distance between those two points. can you try to do that ?

  9. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I could use the distance formula to find coordinates but this is just explaining without actual coordinates. It's confusing lol

  10. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    just use letters instead of numbers.

  11. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    for example x2 is "b" and x1 is "a" use those letters in the formula the y's are easy: both are 0

  12. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    So D=(A^2-0^2) + (B^2-0^2) ?

  13. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    I think you mixed x and y together the formula says \[ D = \sqrt{(x_2-x_1)^2 + (y_2-y_1)^2}\]

  14. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Oh so D=(A^2-B^2) + (0^2-0^2)

  15. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    almost. you don't square each x or y you square the difference. Look at the formula carefully

  16. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I see now! Lol It's D=(A-B) + (0-0)

  17. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the square root of that

  18. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    it is \[ D= \sqrt{ (A-B)^2 +(0-0)^2 } \] we can ignore adding zero, so that simplifies to \[ D= \sqrt{ (A-B)^2}\]

  19. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    now we use the definition \[ |A-B|= \sqrt{(A-B)^2 }\] so show the distance is \[ D= | A-B| \]

  20. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Ok is that all?

  21. phi
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes

  22. Kailee1423
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Thank you!!

  23. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.