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NathalyN

  • one year ago

Hi people can you with this I have a week to try to do this but I just can't please help me!

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  1. NathalyN
    • one year ago
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    . Please create a narrative poem about the war that provides the background setting for the novel that you are reading. Be sure to include a simile and a metaphor. BOOK NIGHT ELIE WEISEL OR OUTSIERS PLEASE HELP ME

  2. NathalyN
    • one year ago
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    @haleyelizabeth2017

  3. haleyelizabeth2017
    • one year ago
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    I have no idea, I apologize.

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Choose a topic. Pick a story that you really want to tell, even if you can’t explain why. It could be something that happened to you (or a friend or loved one) or it could be something that’s completely fictional. Maybe it’s a memory that haunts you, a family legend, a startling dream, or a fantasy that you’d give anything to fulfill. Remember, the narrator of the poem doesn’t have to be you; the narrator can be a character of your choice. Make your voice heard. If the narrator in your poem is experiencing a particular emotion, make sure that comes through in the words and the tone that you choose. A poem can be a snarl, a shout, a whisper or a cry, so pack it with feeling. Skip the build-up. Narrative poems don’t waste words introducing characters or explaining the scene—most dive right in. Try starting your poem in the middle of the action scene to bring readers immediately into the heart of your story. Sweat the small stuff. The best narrative poems use precise, descriptive words that bring out a story’s details and paint a rich picture. Think of the five senses and use adjectives that help describe what the world looks, sounds, smells, tastes, and feels like as the story unfolds so readers will experience it just like you do. For instance, reading about “breakfast” or “a fall day” doesn’t light the imagination, but reading about “soggy cornflakes and last night’s cold coffee” or “dead leaves that crunch underfoot” does. Repeat yourself. This is an especially good strategy if your narrative poem is long. Try repeating key words or phrases that are emotional or musical a few times throughout the poem. (Remember Martin Luther King’s famous speech? He says “I have a dream” eight times during that speech, which is part of what makes it so powerful.)

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