NathalyN
  • NathalyN
Hi people can you with this I have a week to try to do this but I just can't please help me!
English
schrodinger
  • schrodinger
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At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.

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NathalyN
  • NathalyN
. Please create a narrative poem about the war that provides the background setting for the novel that you are reading. Be sure to include a simile and a metaphor. BOOK NIGHT ELIE WEISEL OR OUTSIERS PLEASE HELP ME
NathalyN
  • NathalyN
haleyelizabeth2017
  • haleyelizabeth2017
I have no idea, I apologize.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
Choose a topic. Pick a story that you really want to tell, even if you can’t explain why. It could be something that happened to you (or a friend or loved one) or it could be something that’s completely fictional. Maybe it’s a memory that haunts you, a family legend, a startling dream, or a fantasy that you’d give anything to fulfill. Remember, the narrator of the poem doesn’t have to be you; the narrator can be a character of your choice. Make your voice heard. If the narrator in your poem is experiencing a particular emotion, make sure that comes through in the words and the tone that you choose. A poem can be a snarl, a shout, a whisper or a cry, so pack it with feeling. Skip the build-up. Narrative poems don’t waste words introducing characters or explaining the scene—most dive right in. Try starting your poem in the middle of the action scene to bring readers immediately into the heart of your story. Sweat the small stuff. The best narrative poems use precise, descriptive words that bring out a story’s details and paint a rich picture. Think of the five senses and use adjectives that help describe what the world looks, sounds, smells, tastes, and feels like as the story unfolds so readers will experience it just like you do. For instance, reading about “breakfast” or “a fall day” doesn’t light the imagination, but reading about “soggy cornflakes and last night’s cold coffee” or “dead leaves that crunch underfoot” does. Repeat yourself. This is an especially good strategy if your narrative poem is long. Try repeating key words or phrases that are emotional or musical a few times throughout the poem. (Remember Martin Luther King’s famous speech? He says “I have a dream” eight times during that speech, which is part of what makes it so powerful.)

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