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korosh23

  • one year ago

Chemistry 12 Question! About reaction intermediate It is a reaction that forms products from some reactants and then itself becomes a new reactant in another step. Ex. A + 2X --> AX2 AX2 +X --> AX + X2 AX + A --> A2 + X Overall reaction : 2A + 2X --> A2 + X2 Which of these are reaction intermediates?

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  1. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    Do you see anything on the right side of an arrow which then appears on the left side of an arrow in a later step? That would be a reaction intermediate or reactive intermediate.

  2. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    @whpalmer4, so you mean AX2 and AX? Is there anything else? I have a really important question. Any substance would be reaction intermediate if it is product than it becomes a reactant in later step. Am I right? Can it be vice versa?

  3. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Help please?

  4. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    AX2 and AX appear to be reaction intermediates. The text I'm looking at defines a reactive intermediate as "a species produced in one step of the mechanism and consumed in a later step." I believe that is equivalent to what you said.

  5. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    I found a new information that it agrees with what we discussed above. However, I found something interesting that if a substance is a product on the left side and then it appears on the right side as reactants, it becomes a catalyst.

  6. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443314534620:dw|

  7. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    well, unless the material is not consumed, it isn't a catalyst, and if it is not consumed, it isn't a reactant...where did you see this information?

  8. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Actually the two X get crossed out, so does it mean it is get used up. I do not understand what you exactly mean by consumed ?

  9. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    I have to go for dinner, when I come back, I will read your answer. Thank you for your help.

  10. whpalmer4
    • one year ago
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    A catalyst is a substance that increases the rate of a reaction without being consumed by it. For example, there are platinum&rhodium elements in a catalytic converter in a car's exhaust system which help break down some of the pollutants in the exhaust, but the platinum and rhodium stay there and are not "used up" as they would be if they were reactants. When you use a catalyst in a reaction, you have just as much of the catalyst at the end as you did at the beginning. I am skeptical about a claim that a reaction can produce its own catalyst as you seem to be saying.

  11. korosh23
    • one year ago
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    Exactly, a catalyst speeds up the rxn rate of any reaction as far as I know in Chem 12. My teacher gave that example, and I found it interesting to share it with you. I believe in some reactions the reactants themselves act as a catalyst, however when you look at the equation it is confusing because you do not know if the catalyst is actually used up or is going to exist. That makes a lot of difference as you mentioned. I am going to ask this question from my teacher. Thank you for bringing it up.

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