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anonymous

  • one year ago

Will fan and medal. What is the equation of the line that represents the initial climb?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @pooja195

  3. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    the initial line appears to be vertical -hence the X value doesn't change, therefore the equation is x='constant' . You can get the value of the constant from the graph (NOTE - if this is intended to be the flight of a aircraft then it is evidently impossible to climb like that - ie it gains altitiude in 0 time - an infinite rate of climb. Note 2 - it is not the whole line that is valid for the climb - it is a 'line segment' and is bounded by y=0 and y = 9

  4. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    also - the numbers on your graph don't seem to make sense: you have -10 at both ends of the x axis you have what looks like 1/5 halfway along the negative axis the path hits the ground twice where did this drawing originate?

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @MrNood I didn't mean to have multiple negative 10's. This is a roller coaster project im working on.

  6. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    OK so the x axis is not time - it is distance? and y axis is height? it does mean that you have a truly vertical lift at the beginning - most rides climb up a sloping track.

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @MrNood Yes. But it is possible to have one going straight up

  8. MrNood
    • one year ago
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    yes ok

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @MrNood will you help me with the equation?

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spraguer (Moderator)
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