anonymous
  • anonymous
{I need some help, I'll give medal and fan} ~ The Value of Music That Tickles the Brain ~
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  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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jamiebookeater
  • jamiebookeater
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anonymous
  • anonymous
I can do my best to help. Whatcha need?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Personal taste in music differs dramatically, and yet, when we hear something we like, whether Mozart or Miles, or Metallica or Macklemore, our brains light up in the same way, according to a recent study. And what's more, the research suggests, the value we place on music we've never heard before is directly associated with how much it tickles our brains. The effect music has on the human brain has long been an area of scientific interest. Sounds on their own are bland, but when they come together in melodies and song, they can be intensely pleasing or can move us to tears, for reasons that remain obscure, biologically speaking. It is clear, however, that we associate emotions with music, and the connection between music and reward, the new study indicates, appears to have much to do with "cross-talk," or communication, between two specific areas of the human brain: the auditory cortex, which stores information on sound, and the nucleus accumbens, which stores information on emotions and reward. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while study participants listened to excerpts of music that they were hearing for the first time (to avoid influence from established music preferences), the researchers found that activity in the nucleus accumbens consistently predicted whether participants enjoyed a given excerpt of music and whether they would purchase the music. The greater the activity in the nucleus accumbens, the deeper into their pockets the participants were willing to dig when the pieces were auctioned off in the study. Increased activity in the nucleus accumbens also translated into more cross-talk with the auditory cortex, providing a basis of interaction between the two regions that has been little understood. The kinds of music that participants purchased varied, which likely reflects individual differences in our expectations of music. Our beliefs about music are thought to develop from our prior musical experiences, with sounds and sound patterns that we learn being stuffed away in our auditory cortex. Those experiences frequently are linked to emotions, too. So, when music we hear jibes with what we know or expect or draws on preexisting emotional associations, we might be inclined to like it and buy it. That, hopefully, comes as good news for those who devote their careers to satisfying our impossibly complex musical tastes.
anonymous
  • anonymous
{1} Explain the central idea of the article. {The central idea of the article is the effect that music has on the human brain} {2} Create a list of five key points that help develop the central idea.

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anonymous
  • anonymous
I need help with number two
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay. DO you have any keypoints right now?
anonymous
  • anonymous
no
anonymous
  • anonymous
Alright. I think I can help, but I won't be able to give them all to you. You're going to have to get some yourself.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Sound good?
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay :) I just need help on figuring out how to find the key points myself
anonymous
  • anonymous
:) Awesome. Give me a second.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay, so key points are pretty easy to find. Usually, they're the first part of a paragraph. Like, "The effect music has on the human brain has long been an area of scientific interest." That could be used as a key point. Anything that gives pretty good information could be considered a key point. I like to add a site to use a future reference, so, this is actually from my personal "Library." I used this site a lot. http://www.bestlibrary.org/ssmedia/2009/10/identify-main-points-in-an-article-or-illustration-.html
anonymous
  • anonymous
Okay so what about "Personal taste in music differs dramatically"?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't think that could be one. What about this? "When we hear something we like, whether Mozart or Miles, or Metallica or Macklemore, our brains light up in the same way, according to a recent study."
anonymous
  • anonymous
That could be one. I'm going to try to find again
anonymous
  • anonymous
Awesome. Just try to look for things with good information. Any sentence that you actually learned something from, would work.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Could this be one? the researchers found that activity in the nucleus accumbens consistently predicted whether participants enjoyed a given excerpt of music and whether they would purchase the music.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Yes. That could be.
anonymous
  • anonymous
Awesome, I finally found one :)
anonymous
  • anonymous
You'll find more, trust me.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ArcticReeses Sorry for bugging you but could this also be one? "Sounds on their own are bland, but when they come together in melodies and song, they can be intensely pleasing or can move us to tears, for reasons that remain obscure, biologically speaking."
anonymous
  • anonymous
@firelord Feel free to bug me. If you need something, let me know. And yes. I do believe that would be one.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ArcticReeses I just have to find one more :) and I was wondering could this be one? "We associate emotions with music, and the connection between music and reward, the new study indicates, appears to have much to do with "cross-talk," or communication, between two specific areas of the human brain: the auditory cortex, which stores information on sound, and the nucleus accumbens, which stores information on emotions and reward."
anonymous
  • anonymous
@firelord That sounds like a really good one.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@ArcticReeses Thank you for being very helpful and not the type that just gives answers, you actually helped me learn how to find the key points better then I could before.
anonymous
  • anonymous
@firelord I'm glad I could help. If you need anything else, I'll do my best to help.

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