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anonymous

  • one year ago

Which of the following best explains how King's forms of protest built upon what Gandhi had done?

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  1. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    This is the passage Thoreau’s ideas had a profound effect on a man named Gandhi. Gandhi, was a leader in India who worked to end British rule. He led India to independence and inspired many to non-violent forms of protest and resistance. He fought to end poverty, worked to expand women's right to vote, and built bridges between ethnic and religious groups. Like Thoreau, he lived simply, owned very little, and ate a vegetarian diet. In India, Gandhi's form of protest was called the "non-cooperation movement." He urged Indians to boycott British education systems and leave government jobs. The movement was very popular, and in part to stop its spread, the British controlled government arrested him. After a few years, he was released and became active in politics again. He inspired many to follow him on marches to protest various taxes. On one such march, thousands followed him 240 miles over 24 days to the sea to protest a salt tax. This march set the example of non-violent resistance to the government that others in the country followed. Eventually India won independence from Britain, in large part because of Gandhi work. Gandhi's model of resistance and reform was creative, appealing, and successful. As a result, Dr. Martin Luther King looked to Gandhi when the time came to find a way to resist segregation in the South. The lunch counter protests, famous for the passive response to anger, and even violence, aimed to end the separation enforced by laws in some regions of the South. King also organized walks, marches, and bus rides that were meant to bring attention to the issues facing African Americans. These forms of protest were directly modeled on Gandhi's, but King took them straight to the source of oppression. Where Gandhi's protests created awareness and built momentum, King's protests were in the face of great hatred and fear. The passive, non-violent protests were ultimately effective, mainly because the passive response to violence cast the opposition as brutes. However, change came slowly and at the cost of many lives. King remained committed to peaceful protest, however, until his death. King learned from Gandhi, expanding on what worked, applying old techniques to a new problem. Gandhi owed his philosophy, in part, to a New England poet who loved the woods.

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    the question says " which of the following best explains..." is this a multiple choice question? if so, what answers are available?

  3. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes give me one second

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    A: King gave protesters an alternative to being arrested B: King made Gandhi's model more confrontational C: King taught people how to resist more passively than Gandhi D: King required protesters to endure brutality unlike those of Gandhi

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @gahoolianowl

  6. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay, this one isn't as cut and dry as the past thing i helped you with, so lets start by eliminating options

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    there was no alternative to being arrested. king himself was inprisoned several times. so A is out

  9. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I was just going to say that lol

  10. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    we can eliminate C as well. it mentions nothing about being "more passive"

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay, so now all we have is B and D

  12. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I think maybe D

  13. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    thats correct. the connotation of "confrontational" is one of violence and aggression, therefore making D the better option

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yay! lol thank you for helping :)

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Can you help me with one more?

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure. no problem

  17. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Most people remember Gandhi and Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. as reformers who practiced non-violent forms of protest and advocacy. Both effectively changed the popular opinion about emotional issues for their countries and brought in a wave of change that was long overdue. But the practice of non-violent protest, or civil disobedience, started long before either Gandhi or King. It began with a quiet, shy poet who is best known for writing a lot about a pond. Henry David Thoreau lived from 1817 until 1862, mainly in the area of Concord, Massachusetts. The issue that would tear the country apart in the 1860s had already begun dividing the nation. Thoreau was only 14 when Nat Turner led the slave rebellion in Virginia and was later hanged. In his late 20s, Thoreau began speaking against slavery in public, echoing the voices of freedmen like Frederick Douglass and Lewis Hayden. Thoreau believed that a government that supported slavery was corrupt and immoral. He was also deeply suspicious of government. For these and other reasons, Thoreau refused to pay his poll tax for a number of years. The poll tax was a legal tax owed by every person. It was basically a tax on one's body. After not paying for years, he was at last arrested. He spent only one night in jail, however, as a relative paid the tax for him. He was reportedly furious that any tax was paid on his behalf. It was this experience that Thoreau wrote about in an essay called "Civil Disobedience." In this essay, he argued that being moral and just came before allegiance to government. He wrote “If the machine of government is of such a nature that it requires you to be the agent of injustice to another, then, I say, break the law." He also felt that voting was not enough to ensure that the right thing be done. He wrote that "even voting for the right is doing nothing for it… A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance…" He felt that one had a moral responsibility to resist unjust laws. Read this line: He wrote that "even voting for the right is doing nothing for it… A wise man will not leave the right to the mercy of chance…" Which explains the purpose of this line?

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    These are the answer choices A:To convey the idea that Thoreau was truly a wise man B:To explain Thoreau's view that we have a responsibility to act C:To imply that Thoreau felt he was above the law D:To suggest that Thoreau placed a high value on human life

  19. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    b

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thats what I thought too Thanks

  21. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    my pleasure

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Would you be able to help me with one more?

  23. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    sure

  24. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Read this excerpt from the Preamble to the United States Constitution: United States. Preamble and First Amendment to the United States Constitution. (1787, 1791) Preamble We, the People of the United States, in Order to form a more perfect Union, establish Justice, insure domestic Tranquility, provide for the common defence, promote the general Welfare, and secure the Blessings of Liberty to ourselves and our Posterity, do ordain and establish this Constitution of the United States of America. How did the voting rights acts of 1869, 1920, and 1971 expand the "Blessings of Liberty" to more of the United States' population? Write a short essay to explain your answer.

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    basically, they expanded the right to vote to black males in 1896, the right to vote to women in 1920, and lowering the voting age to 18 1971 on account of the Vietnamese war

  26. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    actually, you might want to look up that 1890's one...

  27. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    okay thank you

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    anything else?

  29. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Thoreau’s ideas had a profound effect on a man named Gandhi. Gandhi, was a leader in India who worked to end British rule. He led India to independence and inspired many to non-violent forms of protest and resistance. He fought to end poverty, worked to expand women's right to vote, and built bridges between ethnic and religious groups. Like Thoreau, he lived simply, owned very little, and ate a vegetarian diet. In India, Gandhi's form of protest was called the "non-cooperation movement." He urged Indians to boycott British education systems and leave government jobs. The movement was very popular, and in part to stop its spread, the British controlled government arrested him. After a few years, he was released and became active in politics again. He inspired many to follow him on marches to protest various taxes. On one such march, thousands followed him 240 miles over 24 days to the sea to protest a salt tax. This march set the example of non-violent resistance to the government that others in the country followed. Eventually India won independence from Britain, in large part because of Gandhi work. Gandhi's model of resistance and reform was creative, appealing, and successful. As a result, Dr. Martin Luther King looked to Gandhi when the time came to find a way to resist segregation in the South. The lunch counter protests, famous for the passive response to anger, and even violence, aimed to end the separation enforced by laws in some regions of the South. King also organized walks, marches, and bus rides that were meant to bring attention to the issues facing African Americans. These forms of protest were directly modeled on Gandhi's, but King took them straight to the source of oppression. Where Gandhi's protests created awareness and built momentum, King's protests were in the face of great hatred and fear. The passive, non-violent protests were ultimately effective, mainly because the passive response to violence cast the opposition as brutes. However, change came slowly and at the cost of many lives. King remained committed to peaceful protest, however, until his death. King learned from Gandhi, expanding on what worked, applying old techniques to a new problem. Gandhi owed his philosophy, in part, to a New England poet who loved the woods. Based on the bolded paragraph, what was different about King’s protests?

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    These are the answer choices A:King's ideas not as popular as Gandhi's. B:King had greater obstacles to overcome than others. C:King had more support than either Gandhi or Thoreau. D:King's protesters faced violence and hatred.

  31. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    @gahoolianowl

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I don't think A is right

  33. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    d

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Okay :)

  35. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    What is the main idea of the bolded paragraph? A: King gave his life for others. B:Gandhi protests raised awareness. C:King used Thoreau and Gandhi ideas. D:Gandhi was a hero to many. This is another question but the passage is the same as the one we just did.

  36. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "Where Gandhi's protests created awareness and built momentum, King's protests were in the face of great hatred and fear. The passive, non-violent protests were ultimately effective, mainly because the passive response to violence cast the opposition as brutes. However, change came slowly and at the cost of many lives."

  37. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    "Gandhi's model of resistance and reform was creative, appealing, and successful. As a result, Dr. Martin Luther King looked to Gandhi when the time came to find a way to resist segregation in the South." here we see that King used Ghandhis ideas, who was in turn using Thureau's ideas

  38. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    So the answer would be C Because king used both ideas

  39. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    yes

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