anonymous
  • anonymous
Which sentence best summarizes the central idea of this story? Bertie strongly dislikes his Aunt Agatha because she treats him poorly. Aunt Agatha wishes Bertie to do something that he does not want to do. Gussie has fled to America to escape from the expectations of Bertie and Aunt Agatha. Jeeves resents being asked to perform chores for Bertie and his Aunt Agatha.
English
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SOLVED
At vero eos et accusamus et iusto odio dignissimos ducimus qui blanditiis praesentium voluptatum deleniti atque corrupti quos dolores et quas molestias excepturi sint occaecati cupiditate non provident, similique sunt in culpa qui officia deserunt mollitia animi, id est laborum et dolorum fuga. Et harum quidem rerum facilis est et expedita distinctio. Nam libero tempore, cum soluta nobis est eligendi optio cumque nihil impedit quo minus id quod maxime placeat facere possimus, omnis voluptas assumenda est, omnis dolor repellendus. Itaque earum rerum hic tenetur a sapiente delectus, ut aut reiciendis voluptatibus maiores alias consequatur aut perferendis doloribus asperiores repellat.
chestercat
  • chestercat
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blurbendy
  • blurbendy
which story?
anonymous
  • anonymous
below complete the story of Bertie and Aunt Agatha. Read the conclusion of the excerpt and answer the question. from "EXTRICATING YOUNG GUSSIE" by P.G. Wodehouse She sprang it on me before breakfast. There in seven words you have a complete character sketch of my Aunt Agatha. I could go on indefinitely about brutality and lack of consideration. I merely say that she routed me out of bed to listen to her painful story somewhere in the small hours. It can't have been half past eleven when Jeeves, my man, woke me out of the dreamless and broke the news: 'Mrs Gregson to see you, sir.' I thought she must be walking in her sleep, but I crawled out of bed and got into a dressing-gown. I knew Aunt Agatha well enough to know that, if she had come to see me, she was going to see me. That's the sort of woman she is. She was sitting bolt upright in a chair, staring into space. When I came in she looked at me in that darn critical way that always makes me feel as if I had gelatin where my spine ought to be. Aunt Agatha is one of those strong-minded women. I should think Queen Elizabeth must have been something like her. She bosses her husband, Spencer Gregson, a battered little chappie on the Stock Exchange. She bosses my cousin, Gussie Mannering-Phipps. She bosses her sister-in-law, Gussie's mother. And, worst of all, she bosses me. She has an eye like a man-eating fish, and she has got moral suasion down to a fine point. I dare say there are fellows in the world—men of blood and iron, don't you know, and all that sort of thing—whom she couldn't intimidate; but if you're a chappie like me, fond of a quiet life, you simply curl into a ball when you see her coming, and hope for the best. My experience is that when Aunt Agatha wants you to do a thing you do it, or else you find yourself wondering why those fellows in the olden days made such a fuss when they had trouble with the Spanish Inquisition. 'Halloa, Aunt Agatha!' I said 'Bertie,' she said, 'you look a sight. You look perfectly dissipated.' I was feeling like a badly wrapped brown-paper parcel. I'm never at my best in the early morning. I said so. 'Early morning! I had breakfast three hours ago, and have been walking in the park ever since, trying to compose my thoughts.' If I ever breakfasted at half past eight I should walk on the Embankment, trying to end it all in a watery grave. 'I am extremely worried, Bertie. That is why I have come to you.' And then I saw she was going to start something, and I bleated weakly to Jeeves to bring me tea. But she had begun before I could get it. 'What are your immediate plans, Bertie?' 'Well, I rather thought of tottering out for a bite of lunch later on, and then possibly staggering round to the club, and after that, if I felt strong enough, I might trickle off to Walton Heath for a round of golf.' 'I am not interested in your totterings and tricklings. I mean, have you any important engagements in the next week or so?' I scented danger. 'Rather,' I said. 'Heaps! Millions! Booked solid!' 'What are they?' 'I—er—well, I don't quite know.' 'I thought as much. You have no engagements. Very well, then, I want you to start immediately for America.' 'America!' Do not lose sight of the fact that all this was taking place on an empty stomach, shortly after the rising of the lark. 'Yes, America. I suppose even you have heard of America?' 'But why America?' 'Because that is where your Cousin Gussie is. He is in New York, and I can't get at him.' 'What's Gussie been doing?' Gussie is making a perfect idiot of himself.' To one who knew young Gussie as well as I did, the words opened up a wide field for speculation. 'In what way?' 'He has lost his head over a creature.' On past performances this rang true. Which sentence best summarizes the central idea of this story? Bertie strongly dislikes his Aunt Agatha because she treats him poorly. Aunt Agatha wishes Bertie to do something that he does not want to do. Gussie has fled to America to escape from the expectations of Bertie and Aunt Agatha. Jeeves resents being asked to perform chores for Bertie and his Aunt Agatha.

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