A community for students.

Here's the question you clicked on:

55 members online
  • 0 replying
  • 0 viewing

calculusxy

  • one year ago

Scientific Notation Question!!! Question posted below...

  • This Question is Closed
  1. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\huge (9 \times 10^6)^{-4}\]

  2. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    Write each answer in scientific notation.

  3. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    @amistre64

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    9*10^-24

  5. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ^ means to the power of

  6. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    but wouldn't the 9 also be raised to the negative four power?

  7. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    no, it's basically stating that the exponents would be multiplied together

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    the 9 is raised to the -4 as well

  9. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    yes that's what i was thinking

  10. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    \[\frac{ 1 }{ 9^4 \times 10^{-24} }\]

  11. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    would that be correct?

  12. jennithemeani
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    The 9 is also raised because it is in the exponent making it (9^-4) (10^-24)

  13. jennithemeani
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    I don' think you are supposed to put it under 1

  14. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    Sense it's under Scientific notation, the only number to be raised to the power of something is usually the ten

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    \[9^{-4}\times10^{-24}=\frac{ 1 }{ 9^4\times10^{24} }\]

  16. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    what format are you trying to write this in?

  17. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    scientific notation

  18. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    ok then you wouldn't want to write them as fractions. keep it as \(9^{-4}\times10^{-24}\) and evaluate 9^-4

  19. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    okay so that would be like 6561

  20. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    1/6561 since the 4 is negative \[9^{-4}=\frac{1}{6561}=1.52\times10^{-4}\] so altogether you have \[1.52\times10^{-4}\times10^{-24}=1.52 \times 10^{-28}\]

  21. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so we have to add 10^{-4} and 10^{-24} together? and why?

  22. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    because when you multiply terms with the same base you add the exponents \[x^a \times x^b=x^{a+b}\]

  23. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    well i was trying to say that usually we would move the decimal over to a number that's larger than 10 and then multiply it by 10^{___} and the blank is like the # of times the decimal was moved over. then we multiply it with the original exponent that was given in the problem.

  24. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    so i was kind of confused

  25. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yeah that's the same thing, except you add it to the original exponent, not multiply

  26. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    okay so if we have now: \[\frac{ 4 \times 10^{-2} }{ 3.01 \times 10^{-2} }\]

  27. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    we would just divide them and then use the same thing that we did for this problem?

  28. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes, and since this is division, subtract the exponents

  29. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    okay. can u hold on for like a minute while i try to solve the problem?

  30. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    sure

  31. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    would it be: 1.33 x 10^0

  32. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    yes

  33. calculusxy
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 1

    thank you so much!

  34. anonymous
    • one year ago
    Best Response
    You've already chosen the best response.
    Medals 0

    you're welcome :)

  35. Not the answer you are looking for?
    Search for more explanations.

    • Attachments:

Ask your own question

Sign Up
Find more explanations on OpenStudy
Privacy Policy

Your question is ready. Sign up for free to start getting answers.

spraguer (Moderator)
5 → View Detailed Profile

is replying to Can someone tell me what button the professor is hitting...

23

  • Teamwork 19 Teammate
  • Problem Solving 19 Hero
  • You have blocked this person.
  • ✔ You're a fan Checking fan status...

Thanks for being so helpful in mathematics. If you are getting quality help, make sure you spread the word about OpenStudy.

This is the testimonial you wrote.
You haven't written a testimonial for Owlfred.