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Marmar10

  • one year ago

Which of the following reactions would be classified as oxidation-reduction? Check all that apply. 2Na(s)+Cl2(g)→2NaCl(s) Na(s)+CuCl(aq)→NaCl(aq)+Cu(s) NaCN(aq)+CuCl(aq)→NaCl(aq)+CuCN(s)

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    what do you think?

  2. marmar10
    • one year ago
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    i thought it was the first one and last one but i got it wrong...

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    let's look at this more closely

  4. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    electrons have to be transferred from one element to the other, in the process of the reaction, so one is oxidized and the other is reduced.

  5. marmar10
    • one year ago
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    how do you know Na doesnt have a charge?

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @marmar10 interesting point, that might be where the point of confusion is. For your reference: "Any pure element—even if it forms diatomic molecules like chlorine (Cl2)—has an oxidation state of zero. Examples of this are Cu or O2." Na(s)+CuCl(aq)→NaCl(aq)+Cu(s) |dw:1443492397750:dw| Na goes from 0 to +1 so it's oxidized Cu goes from +1 to 0 so it's reduced. so electrons are lost from sodium and electrons are gained from copper.

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    i think your point of confusion was that any pure element has an oxidation state of 0

  8. marmar10
    • one year ago
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    yes it makes a lot more sense now. I was looking in my book and it gave examples of ions so no wonder i was confused. Thank you

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @Marmar10 no problem

  10. marmar10
    • one year ago
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    weird the answer was the first and second one

  11. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443493401499:dw|

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    ugh.. yeah.. technically the first one can be classified as oxidation reduction too.

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Sodium goes from 0 to +1 and chlorine goes from 0 to -1

  14. marmar10
    • one year ago
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    ok haha makes sense

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