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anonymous

  • one year ago

An electrically neutral atom of sodium (Na) has the same number of protons as an ion of sodium (Na+). A.) True B.) False

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  1. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    @breezymeetee what do you think the answer is

  2. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    I was going to say False? @Photon336

  3. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Like I can guide you to the correct answer, but why do you think it's false? @breezymeetee

  4. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    well because if protons and Electrons have the same number it would cause the atom to be neutral so it's true? @Photon336

  5. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    Yes this is true @breezymeetee but let me explain

  6. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    inside our nucleus we have protons that have a positive charge and neutrons that have no charge. outside of that we have electrons. so overall the nucleus is positively charged because neutrons have no charge. |dw:1443542049218:dw|

  7. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    The situation that we have with sodium Na is that it's electrically neutral. @breezymeetee the number of protons is actually the identity of our element, usually it doesn't change because if it did we would no longer have sodium. so for these cases the number of protons doesn't change at all.

  8. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Wow I actually Understand it now thank You so much! @Photon336

  9. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    so one last thing before you head off

  10. quin100
    • one year ago
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    wow ur a good teacher

  11. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Yes sir? @Photon336

  12. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    |dw:1443542308475:dw| there are two cases. Case #1 one or more electrons is lost. if this happens, we get a cation a positive charge, WHY? because now there are more protons. so for example let's take potassium for an example. if we took one electron away we have a positive charge now because there are more protons. the number of protons doesn't change because if it did we wouldn't have potassium |dw:1443542443283:dw|

  13. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    the second and last case is when an element gains an electron to become an anion this means now that there are MORE electrons and protons so that's where the charge difference comes from. Take Fluorine |dw:1443542599063:dw| hope this helps

  14. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    correction "more as in more electrons than protons" now

  15. anonymous
    • one year ago
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    Dude Your The Man! I really understand This you explained it more better than my own teacher. Thanks so so much! @Photon336

  16. Photon336
    • one year ago
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    no problem! have a great day

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