anonymous
  • anonymous
How to solve the dimensions of a cylindrical container that can hold a 250 ml water?
Mathematics
  • Stacey Warren - Expert brainly.com
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SOLVED
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katieb
  • katieb
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MrNood
  • MrNood
the volume of a cyclinder is pi * r^2 * h where r is radius of the end of th ecylinder and h is the lenght (or height) of the cylinder. You can see that the volume depends on r AND h so there is not ONE solution to the question. You need to define r or h or a relationship betwen them before you can work out specific dimensions
anonymous
  • anonymous
I don't understand... kindly explain it further.
MrNood
  • MrNood
you could have a short wide cylinder or a tall narrow one BOTH having volume 25ml |dw:1443616515327:dw| the volume is pi * r^2 * h so there are different combinations of r and h which give the same volume

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MrNood
  • MrNood
(I meant 250 ml above ) But it is the same concept for all volumes - you can have differnt shapes which contain the same volume
MrNood
  • MrNood
So - does your question give you any more information?
anonymous
  • anonymous
I mean, we are given a problem stated that: Goal: To find the best dimensions and shapes of a container that will hold a 250 ml. of guava Juice. Then the situation is: Each group will play the role of a Package Designer. You are to design a container that will hold 250 ml. of guava juice.
anonymous
  • anonymous
The best container is the one that has the least material cost but is the most efficient one. Use table of values to find the dimension of the can that minimizes the surface area. 1. Make 1 cylindrical container, 1 rectangular container, and 1 cubic container.
MrNood
  • MrNood
you can't have a rectangular container - a rectangle is a flat shape do you mean a 'cuboid' if so - it will be the same answer as the cube. Are you studying maxima and minima? Does that include differential calculus?
anonymous
  • anonymous
nope... I mean a rectangular prism. I don't know the maxima and minima... sorry
MrNood
  • MrNood
well - I know the answer to these questions but I am not sure how to explain to you. What methods are you currently studying - how have oyu found maximum or minimum values in class?
MrNood
  • MrNood
this is a calculus question in my book - I'm not sure of anohter way to find the minimum values required
anonymous
  • anonymous
nope, not yet. We're just studying about volumes.
MrNood
  • MrNood
well - I will tell you 2 facts to get your answer - but they are derived using calculus so I am not sure how you would get them without being told: The cylinder which ahs the minimum area for a given volume is when the diameter is equal to the height. Th erectangular prism which has the minimum are for a given volume is when all sides are equal (i.e. it is a cube) you can use these to work out the container with minimum area given a volume of 250ml
anonymous
  • anonymous
so what are the formulas of that?
MrNood
  • MrNood
you can do that
anonymous
  • anonymous
I mean, I still need to know the formula.
MrNood
  • MrNood
if you are studying volumes then you must know th evolume of a cube (l^3) and the volume of a cylinder (pi r^2 h) use the facts above, and the volume = 250 ml to work out the dimensions (1 ml = 1mm^3)
MrNood
  • MrNood
note it is the DIAMETER = height foir the cylinder (not the radius)
anonymous
  • anonymous
do you mean, 1ml = 1mm^3? and not 1ml=1cm^3?

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